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Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems

, Volume 78, Issue 1, pp 1–14 | Cite as

Accounting for the utilization of a N2O mitigation tool in the IPCC inventory methodology for agricultural soils

  • T. J. Clough
  • H. J. Di
  • K. C. Cameron
  • R. R. Sherlock
  • A. K. Metherell
  • H. Clark
  • G. Rys
Original paper

Abstract

In this study we review recent studies where dicyandiamide was used as a nitrification inhibitor to reduce both N2O emissions from urine patches and nitrate leaching from pasture systems, and which led to the development of a commercial product for use on farmland. On average, emissions of N2O and nitrate leaching were reduced by 72% and 61%, respectively. This study then demonstrates how a mitigation tool can be accounted for in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s inventory methodology when constructing an inventory of New Zealand’s agricultural soil N2O emissions. The current New Zealand specific emission factors for EF1 (0.01), EF3PRP (0.01) and FracLEACH (0.07) are amended to values of 0.0058, 0.0058 and 0.0455. Examples are also given, based on overseer™ models, of the implications of farm management scenarios on N2O inventories and total greenhouse gas production when using a N2O mitigation tool; CO2 equivalents kg−1 milk solid decreased from 14.2 to as little as 11.7, depending on the management scenario modelled.

Keywords

Agriculture Dicyandiamide Global positioning system Nitrification inhibitor 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. J. Clough
    • 1
  • H. J. Di
    • 1
  • K. C. Cameron
    • 1
  • R. R. Sherlock
    • 1
  • A. K. Metherell
    • 2
  • H. Clark
    • 3
  • G. Rys
    • 4
  1. 1.Centre for Soil & Environmental QualityLincoln UniversityLincolnNew Zealand
  2. 2.Ravensdown Fertiliser Co-operative LimitedChristchurchNew Zealand
  3. 3.AgResearch LimitedGrasslands Research CentrePalmerston NorthNew Zealand
  4. 4.Ministry of Agriculture and ForestryWellingtonNew Zealand

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