Advertisement

International Journal of Fracture

, Volume 132, Issue 1, pp 81–97 | Cite as

Assessment of an instrumented Charpy impact machine

  • Anton Shterenlikht
  • Sayyed H. Hashemi
  • John R. Yates
  • Ian C. Howard
  • Robert M. Andrews
Article

Abstract

The dynamic responses of the standard Charpy impact machine were studied experimentally using strain gauges and accelerometer attached to the striker and the rotary position sensor fixed at the rotating axis and numerically with the finite element analysis. The fracture propagation was simulated with the cellular automata finite element approach developed earlier. A series of low velocity as well as full capacity Charpy tests were analysed. It was found that the strain gauge signal recorded close to the tup edge and the acceleration recorded at the back of the striker do not match. The energy calculated with the strain gauge data agrees well with the dial reading, while the energy calculated with the accelerometer signal is never near it. Frequencies close to the first natural \hbox{frequency} of the Charpy sample have high modal magnitudes in the acceleration signal but are effectively damped in the strain gauge response. Vibrations of the striker arm have highest modal magnitudes in the rotary position sensor. A low-pass filter is used to obtain the striker movements. The finite element analysis partly supports the experimental observations but also suggests that acceleration at the tup edge suffers higher oscillations than strain.

Keywords

Accelerometer Charpy test FEA rotary position sensor strain gauge 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Andrews, R.M., Howard, I.C., Shterenlikht A., and Yates, J.R. (2002). The Effective Resistance of Pipeline Steels to Running Ductile Fractures; Modelling of Laboratory Test Data. In: A. Neimitz, I.V. Rokach, D. Kocańda, and K. Gołoś (eds.): ECF14, Fracture Mechanics Beyond 2000. Sheffield, UK, pp. 65–72, EMAS Publications.Google Scholar
  2. ASTM, E 23 1998Standard Test Methods for Notched Bar Impact Testing of Metallic MaterialsAmerican Society for Testing and MaterialsPhiladelphiaGoogle Scholar
  3. Bellizzi, S., Bouc, R. 1999Analysis of multi-degree of freedom strongly non-linear mechanical systems with random input Part II: Equivalent linear systems with random matrices and power spectral density matrixProbabilistic Engineering Mechanics14245256Google Scholar
  4. ISO 14556 (2000). International Standard. Steel – Charpy V-notch pendulum impact test – Instrumented test method. International Organization for Standardization.Google Scholar
  5. Kobayashi, T. 1984Analysis of impact properties of A533 steel for nuclear reactor pressure vessel by instrumented Charpy testEngineering Fracture Mechanics194965Google Scholar
  6. Kobayashi, T., Yamamoto, I., Niinomi, M. 1993Introduction of a new dynamic fracture toughness evaluation systemJournal of Testing and Evaluation21145153ADSGoogle Scholar
  7. Marur, P.R. 1998Charpy specimen – a simply supported beam or a constrained free – free beam?Engineering Fracture Mechanics61369386Google Scholar
  8. Marur, P.R. 2000Dynamic analysis of one-point bend impact testEngineering Fracture Mechanics674153Google Scholar
  9. Marur, P.R., Nair, P.S., Simha, K.R.Y. 1996Two degrees of freedom modelling of precracked beam under impactEngineering Fracture Mechanics53481491Google Scholar
  10. Marur, P.R., Simha, K.R.Y., Nair, P.S. 1994Dynamic analysis of three point bend specimens under impactInternational Journal of Fracture68261273Google Scholar
  11. Marur, P.R., Simha, K.R.Y., Nair, P.S. 1995A compact testing system for dynamic fracture studiesJournal of Testing and Evaluation23267274CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Nash, G.E. 1971Bending deflections and moments in a notched beamEngineering Fracture Mechanics3139150Google Scholar
  13. Rousselier, G., Devaux, J.-C., Mottel, G. and Devesa, G. (1989). A methodology of ductile fracture analysis based on damage mechanics: an illustration of a local approach of fracture. In: Non-linear fracture mechanics: Volume II - Elastic-Plastic Fracture, ASTM STP 995. (J.D. Landes, Saxena, A. and Merkle J.G.) edited by Philadelphia, 332–354.Google Scholar
  14. Sahraoui, S., Lataillade, J.L. 1998Analysis of load oscillations in instrumented impact testingEngineering Fracture Mechanics60437446Google Scholar
  15. Shterenlikht, A. eds. 20033D CAFE modelling of transitional ductile – brittle fracture in steel. Ph.D. thesis, Mechanical Engineering DepartmentSheffield UniversityUKGoogle Scholar
  16. Shterenlikht, A., Howard, I.C. 2004Cellular Automata Finite Element (CAFE) modelling of transitional ductile – brittle fracture in steelProc. of the the 15th Eur. Conf. of Fracture (ECF15) KTH, StockholmSweden1113Google Scholar
  17. Timoshenko, S., Young, D.H. and Weaver, W. Jr. (1974). Vibrational Problems in Engineering. Wiley, 4th edition.Google Scholar
  18. Williams, J.G. 1987The analysis of dynamic fracture using lumped mass-spring modelsInternational Journal of Fracture334759Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anton Shterenlikht
    • 1
  • Sayyed H. Hashemi
    • 2
  • John R. Yates
    • 2
  • Ian C. Howard
    • 2
  • Robert M. Andrews
    • 2
  1. 1.Manchester Materials Science CentreManchester UniversityManchesterUK
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of BirjandBirjandIran

Personalised recommendations