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Scheduling of FMSs with information delays: A simulation study

  • Rahul Caprihan
  • Subhash Wadhwa
Article

Abstract

Practitioners and academicians throughout the world recognize the crucial role played by flexibility within manufacturing organizations, especially those engaged in small batch manufacture. However, although the concept of flexibility has begun to attract increased attention, its interaction with information integration and automation has not captured due attention. For example, it almost always has been assumed that a real-time control mechanism is available for exploiting routing flexibility on the shop floor. While this may be true for FMSs, it generally is not so for the vast majority of conventional manufacturing systems with varying levels of information integration and automation. The lack of a fully integrated and automated control mechanism within such semi-automated flexible manufacturing systems (SAFMSs) would eventually cause delays in the availability of shop status information. In this paper, we study the impact that defined modes of information delay have on the performance of a hypothetical SAFMS through detailed simulation experiments. Given that the level of routing flexibility is a controllable design parameter, our interest is in determining the impact that information delays have on decisions pertaining to the selection of appropriate levels of routing flexibility. To highlight the impact of information delays within the SAFMS, the Taguchi experimental design procedure is adopted as a performance evaluation and analysis vehicle, using makespan as a measure of performance. Simulation results indicate the presence of a system specific tolerance limit, operation below which minimizes performance loss.

Keywords

Information delays Routing flexibility Dynamic sequencing and dispatching Simulation Taguchi experimental design 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringDayalbagh Educational InstituteAgraIndia
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringIndian Institute of TechnologyNew DelhiIndia

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