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Fish Physiology and Biochemistry

, Volume 43, Issue 2, pp 385–395 | Cite as

Characterization of pax3a and pax3b genes in artificially induced polyploid and gynogenetic olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) during embryogenesis

  • Shuang Jiao
  • Zhihao Wu
  • Xungang Tan
  • Yulei Sui
  • Lijuan Wang
  • Feng You
Article
  • 187 Downloads

Abstract

Although chromosome set manipulation techniques including polyploidy induction and gynogentic induction in flatfish are becoming increasingly mature, there exists a poor understanding of their effects on embryonic development. PAX3 plays crucial roles during embryonic myogenesis and neurogenesis. In olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), there are two duplicated pax3 genes (pax3a, pax3b), and both of them are expressed in the brain and muscle regions with some subtle regional differences. We utilized pax3a and pax3b as indicators to preliminarily investigate whether chromosome set manipulation affects embryonic neurogenesis and myogenesis using whole-mount in situ hybridization. In the polyploid induction groups, 94 % of embryos in the triploid induction group had normal pax3a/3b expression patterns; however, 45 % of embryos in the tetraploid induction group showed abnormal pax3a/3b expression patterns from the tailbud formation stage to the hatching stage. Therefore, the artificial induction of triploidy and tetraploidy had a small or a moderate effect on flounder embryonic myogenesis and neurogenesis, respectively. In the gynogenetic induction groups, 87 % of embryos in the meiogynogenetic diploid induction group showed normal pax3a/3b expression patterns. However, almost 100 % of embryos in the gynogenetic haploid induction group and 63 % of embryos in the mitogynogenetic diploid induction group showed abnormal pax3a/3b expression patterns. Therefore, the induction of gynogenetic haploidy and mitogynogenetic diploidy had large effects on flounder embryonic myogenesis and neurogenesis. In conclusion, the differential expression of pax3a and pax3b may provide new insights for consideration of fish chromosome set manipulation.

Keywords

Gynogenetic induction group Olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceuspax3a pax3b Triploid induction group Tetraploid induction group 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Dr. Erik Anderson for proofreading this manuscript. This work was supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (863 Program) (No. 2012AA10A402), the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC, 31502146 and 31502156), the Shandong Provincial Natural Science Foundation, China (BS2014HZ008), and the Scientific and Technological Innovation Project Financially Supported by Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology (No. 2015ASKJ02).

Supplementary material

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Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 4058 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shuang Jiao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhihao Wu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xungang Tan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yulei Sui
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Lijuan Wang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Feng You
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Experimental Marine Biology, Institute of OceanologyChinese Academy of SciencesQingdaoPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Laboratory for Marine Biology and BiotechnologyQingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and TechnologyQingdaoPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.University of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingPeople’s Republic of China

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