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Euphytica

, 213:88 | Cite as

Diallel analysis of acid soil tolerant and susceptible maize inbred lines for grain yield under acid and non-acid soil conditions

  • Charles Mutimaamba
  • John MacRobert
  • Jill E. Cairns
  • Cosmos E. Magorokosho
  • Thokozile Ndhlela
  • Collis Mukungurutse
  • Adré Minnaar-Ontong
  • Maryke T. Labuschagne
Article
  • 244 Downloads

Abstract

Maize is not inherently tolerant to soil acidity but due to the ever increasing demand for the crop in the developing world, production of maize on acid soils continues to expand. Breeding for maize acid soil tolerance is the best strategy to improve yield under these conditions. Therefore, the current study was done to determine the general combining ability (GCA) of eight acid-soil tolerant and susceptible inbred lines and the specific combining ability (SCA) of cross combinations of these lines for grain yield under acid and non-acid soils. The eight lines were crossed using a diallel mating design to produce 28 single cross hybrids for evaluation under acid and non-acid soils at four sites for two seasons. Line C2 was the best general combiner under both soil environments while A2/C1 and A1/C2 had the highest desirable SCA effects under optimal conditions. Loss in grain yield and sensitivity to low pH stress was higher among genotypes in light textured soils than heavy soils. Non-additive gene action was more important than additive gene action in conditioning grain yield under both environments. Results revealed that it was feasible to improve grain yield under low pH and optimum soils from the set of genotypes used in the current study.

Keywords

Acid soil Combining ability Maize Yield 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation project Drought Tolerant Maize for Africa (DTMA) and the CGIAR Research Program MAIZE for which the authors are sincerely grateful. Due acknowledgement is gratefully extended to staff of DR&SS, CIMMYT Southern Africa Regional Office, Domboshava Training Centre and Danmaglass Farm.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles Mutimaamba
    • 1
    • 3
  • John MacRobert
    • 2
  • Jill E. Cairns
    • 2
  • Cosmos E. Magorokosho
    • 2
  • Thokozile Ndhlela
    • 3
  • Collis Mukungurutse
    • 4
  • Adré Minnaar-Ontong
    • 1
  • Maryke T. Labuschagne
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant Sciences (Plant Breeding)University of the Free StateBloemfonteinSouth Africa
  2. 2.CIMMYTHarareZimbabwe
  3. 3.Crop Breeding InstituteHarareZimbabwe
  4. 4.Chemistry and Soils Research InstituteHarareZimbabwe

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