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Euphytica

, Volume 183, Issue 2, pp 207–226 | Cite as

QTL detection of seven quality traits in wheat using two related recombinant inbred line populations

  • Jun Li
  • Fa Cui
  • An-ming Ding
  • Chun-hua Zhao
  • Xiu-qin Wang
  • Lin Wang
  • Yin-guang Bao
  • Xiao-lei Qi
  • Xing-feng Li
  • Ju-rong Gao
  • De-shun Feng
  • Hong-gang Wang
Article

Abstract

Grain protein content (GPC) and gluten quality are the most important factors determining the end-use quality of wheat for pasta-making. Both GPC and gluten quality are considered to be polygenic traits influenced by environmental factors and other agricultural practices. Two related F8:9 recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations were generated to localise genetic factors controlling seven quality traits: GPC, wet gluten content (WGC), flour whiteness (FW), kernel hardness (KH), water absorption (Abs), dough development time (DDT) and dough stability time (DST). These lines were derived by crossing Weimai 8 and Jimai 20 (WJ) and by crossing Weimai 8 and Yannong 19 (WY). In total, WJ comprised 485 lines, while WY comprised 229 lines. Data on these seven quality traits were collected from each line in five different environments. Up to 85 putative QTLs for the seven traits were detected in WJ and 65 putative QTLs were detected in WY. Of these QTLs, 31 QTLs (36.47%) were detected in at least two trials in WJ, while 24 QTLs (36.92%) were detected in at least two trials in WY. Three QTLs from WJ and 25 from WY accounted for more than 10% of the phenotypic variance. The total 150 QTLs were spread throughout all 21 wheat chromosomes. Of these, at least thirteen pairwise were common to both populations, accounting for 20.00 and 15.29% of the total QTLs in WJ and WY, respectively. A major QTL for GPC, accounting for 53.04% of the phenotypic variation, was detected on chromosome 5A. A major QTL for WGC also shared this interval, explained more than 36% of the phenotypic variation, and was significant in two environments. Though co-located QTLs were common, every trait had its unique control mechanism, even for two closely related traits. Due to the different sizes of the two line populations, we also assessed the effects of population size on the efficiency and precision of QTL detection. In sum, this study will enhance our understanding of the genetic basis of these seven pivotal quality traits and facilitate the breeding of improved wheat varieties.

Keywords

RIL QTL Quality trait Genetic relationship Wheat 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program, 2006CB101700). The author thanks Sishen Li, College of Agronomy, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China, for kindly providing EST-SSR markers.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jun Li
    • 1
  • Fa Cui
    • 1
  • An-ming Ding
    • 1
  • Chun-hua Zhao
    • 1
  • Xiu-qin Wang
    • 2
  • Lin Wang
    • 3
  • Yin-guang Bao
    • 1
  • Xiao-lei Qi
    • 1
  • Xing-feng Li
    • 1
  • Ju-rong Gao
    • 1
  • De-shun Feng
    • 1
  • Hong-gang Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, Shandong Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, Taian Subcenter of National Wheat Improvement Center, College of AgronomyShandong Agricultural UniversityTaianChina
  2. 2.Municipal Academy of Agricultural SciencesZaozhuangChina
  3. 3.Municipal Academy of Agricultural SciencesJiningChina

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