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Euphytica

, Volume 155, Issue 1–2, pp 125–133 | Cite as

Isolation, chromosomal location, and expression analysis of putative powdery mildew resistance genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

  • Ping Wan
  • Lijun Ling
  • Shuanghe Cao
  • Xianping Wang
  • Wenjun Zhang
  • Hongqing Ling
  • Lihuang Zhu
  • Xiangqi Zhang
Article

Abstract

Special and degenerate primers are designed according to the conservative sequence of barley powdery mildew resistance genes Mla1, Mla6, and Mla13. Two wheat Mla-like orthologs, TaMla-2 and TaMla-3 are cloned and sequenced from the cDNA of wheat resistant-powdery mildew line TAM104R by RT-PCR method. TaMla-2 and TaMla-3 encode distinct but highly related coiled-coil nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat type (NBS-LRR) resistant disease proteins and both reveal about 74 and 81% identity with amino acid sequence of Mla1, respectively. They are multiple copies in wheat genomes, one copy of them is mapped on wheat chromosome 1AL and two on 1BL using Chinese Spring nulli-tetra-somic lines and ditelosomic lines of 1A, 1B and 1D in southern analysis. This result suggests that may be the two Mla-like genes originated from the two diploid ancestral genomes, respectively. The expression pattern analysis of semi-quantitative PCR shows the TaMla genes are mainly expressed in leaf and sheath, and expression level is enhanced in organs infected by Erysiphe graminis, suggesting that TaMla-2 and TaMla-3 are powdery mildew resistance related-genes in wheat.

Keywords

Triticum aestivum Powdery mildew resistance Mla-ortholog Gene cloning Chromosome location Expression 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Professor Xiayu Duan and associate professor Yilin Zhou in Institute of Plant Protection, CAAS for inoculating and identifying all materials by Erysiphe graminis f. sp. tritici. This work was supported by grants from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (J00-A-002, 2004BA525B03) and NSFC(30540057).

Supplementary material

10681_2006_9313_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (228 kb)
Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ping Wan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lijun Ling
    • 1
    • 3
  • Shuanghe Cao
    • 1
  • Xianping Wang
    • 1
  • Wenjun Zhang
    • 1
  • Hongqing Ling
    • 1
  • Lihuang Zhu
    • 1
  • Xiangqi Zhang
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Plant Cell and Chromosome EngineeringInstitute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of SciencesAndingmenwaiChina
  2. 2.Department of Plant Science and TechnologyBeijing University of AgricultureChangping DistrictChina
  3. 3.Gansu Academy of Agricultural SciencesLanzhouChina

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