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Euphytica

, Volume 151, Issue 2, pp 135–144 | Cite as

QTL analysis for grain weight in common wheat

  • Neeraj Kumar
  • Pawan L. Kulwal
  • Anupama Gaur
  • Akhilesh K. Tyagi
  • Jitendra P. Khurana
  • Paramjit Khurana
  • Harindra S. Balyan
  • Pushpendra K. Gupta
Article

Abstract

Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis for grain weight (GW = 1000 grain weight) in common wheat was conducted using a set of 100 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross ‘Rye Selection 111 (high GW) × Chinese Spring (low GW)’. The RILs and their two parental genotypes were evaluated for GW in six different environments (three locations × two years). Genotyping of RILs was carried out using 449 (30 SSRs, 299 AFLP and 120 SAMPL) polymorphic markers. Using the genotyping data of RILs, framework linkage maps were prepared for three chromosomes (1A, 2B, 7A), which were earlier identified by us to carry important/major genes for GW following monosomic analysis. QTL analysis for GW was conducted following genome-wide single marker regression analysis (SMA) and composite interval mapping (CIM) using molecular maps for the three chromosomes. Following SMA, 12 markers showed associations with GW, individual markers explaining 6.57% to 10.76% PV (phenotypic variation) for GW in individual environments. The high grain weight parent, Rye Selection111, which is an agronomically superior genotype, contributed favourable alleles for GW at six of the 12 marker loci identified through SMA. The CIM identified two stable and definitive QTLs, one each on chromosome arms 2BS and 7AS, which were also identified through SMA, and a third suggestive QTL on 1AS. These QTLs explained 9.06% to 19.85% PV for GW in different environments. The QTL for GW on 7AS is co-located with a QTL for heading date suggesting the occurrence of a QTL having a positive pleiotropic effect on the two traits. Some of the markers identified during the present study may prove useful for marker-assisted selection, while breeding for high GW in common wheat.

Keywords

Common wheat Grain weight QTL analysis SMA CIM 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Neeraj Kumar
    • 1
  • Pawan L. Kulwal
    • 2
  • Anupama Gaur
    • 3
  • Akhilesh K. Tyagi
    • 3
  • Jitendra P. Khurana
    • 3
  • Paramjit Khurana
    • 3
  • Harindra S. Balyan
    • 1
  • Pushpendra K. Gupta
    • 1
  1. 1.Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Genetics & Plant BreedingCh. Charan Singh UniversityMeerutIndia
  2. 2.Department of Agricultural BotanyDr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Agricultural UniversityAkolaIndia
  3. 3.Department of Plant Molecular BiologyUniversity of DelhiNew DelhiIndia

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