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Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal

, Volume 26, Issue 4, pp 279–295 | Cite as

Same Direction, Different Paths: a Phenomenological Study of Employees who are Religious yet Open to Religious Pluralism

  • Kelly A. Phipps
  • Gina S. Matkin
Article

Abstract

While there is a growing interest in workplace spirituality, much of that focus excludes religion even though the vast majority of people are affiliated with a religious tradition. Attempts to bring one’s “whole self” to work can be problematic for those who are religious because of concerns of offense or proselytizing. This phenomenological study explored the lived experience of a group of 15 professional employees who were personally religious while also remaining open to religious pluralism in the workplace. This group was largely Christian, and was chosen from participants in leadership seminars and graduate courses in the United States. Analysis revealed four different postures used by participants to express openness toward religious difference. These approaches are described in detail, and the implications of these finding for the advancement of pluralism in the workplace are considered.

Keywords

Religion Diversity Workplace spirituality Religious pluralism 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Helzberg School of ManagementRockhurst UniversityKansas CityUSA
  2. 2.Department of ALECUniversity of Nebraska-LincolnLincolnUSA

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