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Causality relationships between renewable energy, nuclear energy and economic growth in France

Abstract

This paper analyzes the dynamics and quantitative relationships between renewable energy production, nuclear energy production and economic growth on the basis of quarterly data from 2001Q1 to 2012Q3 in France. We employ unit root tests, the augmented Dickey–Fuller and the Philips–Perron, Granger causality test and variance decompositions to uncover the extent and the magnitude of the relationship among variables. The econometric evidence seems to suggest that there is a unidirectional relationship between the economic growth and the nuclear electricity production, since the growth hypothesis is valid. While there is a unidirectional causality at short-term running from the renewable energy production to the primary production of all energies at 10 % level.

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Correspondence to Mounir Ben Mbarek.

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Mbarek, M.B., Khairallah, R. & Feki, R. Causality relationships between renewable energy, nuclear energy and economic growth in France. Environ Syst Decis 35, 133–142 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10669-015-9537-6

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Keywords

  • Nuclear energy
  • Renewable energy
  • Economic growth
  • Granger causality
  • Variance decompositions