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The Environmentalist

, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp 501–504 | Cite as

Study of high-frequency electromagnetic field effect on some somatic and neuro-behavioral characteristics in healthy and neurodefective mice

  • František Vožeh
  • Antonín Doněk
  • Jan Cendelín
  • Ivana Korelusová
  • Jan Vrba
Article

Abstract

The effect of long-term exposure to high frequency electromagnetic field (HF EMF) on some somatic and neural characteristics was studied in neurodefective Lurcher mutant (+/Lc) and normal wild type mice (+/+). Both newborn and young adult (3 months) animals derived from two strains (C3H, B6CBA) were exposed to HF EMF (870 MHz) from 1st to 21st day or from 91st to 120th day respectively. In animals of both groups and controls we observed the development of body weight. Moreover, in the HF EMF exposed adult B6CBA animals we studied spatial learning ability, motor functions and the CNS excitability. To investigate specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in experimental animals we have done the basic 3D calculations of the electromagnetic energy distribution in the simplified model of the mouse. The HF EMF exposed animals exhibited mild differences of body weight between them and unexposed controls. The long-term exposure to HF EMF did not significantly influence the ability to learn in the Morris water maze. However, significant lower swimming speed was found in the irradiated +/Lc as well as lower motor activity of +/+ in the open field when compared to controls. No significant differences were found between HF EMF irradiated animals and controls in examination of the CNS excitability and motor functions.

Keywords

High frequency electromagnetic field Specific absorption rate Lurcher mutant mice Spatial learning Body weight 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

The work was supported by the Research Program Project MSM 021620816.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • František Vožeh
    • 1
  • Antonín Doněk
    • 1
  • Jan Cendelín
    • 1
  • Ivana Korelusová
    • 1
  • Jan Vrba
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine in PilsenCharles University in PraguePlzen Czech Republic
  2. 2.Department of Electromagnetic Field, Faculty of Electrical EngineeringCzech Technical University in PraguePraha 6Czech Republic

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