Adaptation to climate change through agricultural paradigm shift

Abstract

Agriculture stands as the basis of human life, and it is important to sustain affordable food provision of this support system through powerful adaptation to climate change as the worldwide effects of climatic hazards are becoming more evident. Specifically, some semiarid and arid areas of developing countries are more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. To reduce vulnerability of these regions, realizing context-specific impediments of robust adaptation to climate change is necessary. Also, it is imperative to consider anticipated transformations of agricultural systems that are required to enhance resilience of agriculture in coping with climate change. Therefore, this study aims to investigate major adaptation barriers in agriculture sector of Fars province, Iran. It also attempts to identify if any transformation from productivist agricultural systems is needed. To achieve these objectives, the group analytic hierarchy process was conducted with representatives from local government, academic institutes and farmers. The results revealed that local stakeholders prioritized barriers to adaptation, differently, and they showed various levels of concern about the importance of some barriers. However, they identified the governance and policy-related issues as the most important barriers. The results also indicated that transformational adaptation of agriculture sector from productivist to multifunctional farming system is required in order to enhance its resilience under uncertain climatic conditions. Some recommendations are offered to eliminate barriers of agricultural adaptation to climate change and also facilitate transformational adaptation of agriculture, in the developing world.

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Karimi, V., Karami, E., Karami, S. et al. Adaptation to climate change through agricultural paradigm shift. Environ Dev Sustain (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10668-020-00825-8

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Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Adaptation barriers
  • Productivist agriculture
  • Post-productivist agriculture
  • Multifunctional agriculture
  • Governance
  • Developing countries