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Evaluation of ozonation technique for pesticide residue removal and its effect on ascorbic acid, cyanidin-3-glucoside, and polyphenols in apple (Malus domesticus) fruits

  • Saurabh Swami
  • Raunaq Muzammil
  • Supradip Saha
  • Ahammed Shabeer
  • Dasharath Oulkar
  • Kaushik Banerjee
  • Shashi Bala Singh
Article
  • 431 Downloads

Abstract

Ozonated water dip technique was evaluated for the detoxification of six pesticides, i.e., chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, azoxystrobin, hexaconazole, methyl parathion, and chlorothalonil from apple fruits. Results revealed that ozonation was better than washing alone. Ozonation for 15 min decreased residues of the test pesticides in the range of from 26.91 to 73.58%, while ozonation for 30 min could remove the pesticide residues by 39.39–95.14 % compared to 19.05–72.80 % by washing. Cypermethrin was the least removed pesticide by washing as well as by ozonation. Chlorothalonil, chlorpyrifos, and azoxystrobin were removed up to 71.45–95.14 % in a 30-min ozonation period. In case of methyl parathion removal, no extra advantage could be obtained by ozonation. The HPLC analysis indicated that ozonation also affected adversely the ascorbic acid and cyanidin-3-glucoside content of apples. However, 11 polyphenols studied showed a mixed trend. Gallic acid, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, catechin, epicatechin, p-coumaric acid, quercetin-3-O-glucoside, quercetin, and kaempferol were found to decrease while syringic acid, rutin, and resveratrol were found to increase in 30-min ozonation.

Keywords

Ozonation Detoxification Pesticides Ascorbic acid Cyanidin-3-glucoside Polyphenols 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors are thankful to the Indian Council of Agricultural Research, New Delhi, India for providing Senior Research Fellowship toward the Ph.D. program of the first author. We are also grateful to the Division of Agricultural Chemicals, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi for providing the necessary facilities for the undertaking of this study.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Saurabh Swami
    • 1
  • Raunaq Muzammil
    • 1
  • Supradip Saha
    • 1
  • Ahammed Shabeer
    • 2
  • Dasharath Oulkar
    • 2
  • Kaushik Banerjee
    • 2
  • Shashi Bala Singh
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Agricultural ChemicalsICAR-Indian Agricultural Research InstituteNew DelhiIndia
  2. 2.ICAR-National Research Centre for GrapesPuneIndia

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