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Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

, Volume 184, Issue 4, pp 1985–1989 | Cite as

Effect of pendimethalin and quizalofop on N2-fixing bacteria in relation to availability of nitrogen in a Typic Haplustept soil of West Bengal, India

  • Amal C. Das
  • Hemanta Nayek
  • S. Devi Nongthombam
Article

Abstract

An experiment was conducted under laboratory conditions to investigate the effect of two systemic herbicides viz., pendimethalin and quizalofop, at their recommended field rates (1.0 kg and 50 g active ingredient ha − 1, respectively) on the growth and activities of non-symbiotic N2-fixing bacteria in relation to mineralization and availability of nitrogen in a Typic Haplustept soil. Both the herbicides, either singly or in a combination, stimulated the growth and activities of N2-fixing bacteria resulting in higher mineralization and availability of nitrogen in soil. The single application of quizalofop increased the proliferation of aerobic non-symbiotic N2-fixing bacteria to the highest extent while that of pendimethalin exerted maximum stimulation to their N2-fixing capacity in soil. Both the herbicides, either alone or in a combination, did not have any significant difference in the stimulation of total nitrogen content and availability of exchangeable NH4  +  while the solubility of NO3  −  was highly manifested when the herbicides were applied separately in soil.

Keywords

Herbicides Pendimethalin Quizalofop N2-fixation N-mineralization Haplustept soil 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amal C. Das
    • 1
  • Hemanta Nayek
    • 1
  • S. Devi Nongthombam
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil ScienceBidhan Chandra Krishi ViswavidyalayaMohanpurIndia

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