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Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

, Volume 179, Issue 1–4, pp 293–299 | Cite as

Ameliorating effect of N-acetylcysteine and curcumin on pesticide-induced oxidative DNA damage in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

  • Tanzeel Ahmed
  • Rahul Pathak
  • MD. Mustafa
  • Rajarshi Kar
  • Ashok K. Tripathi
  • Rafat S. Ahmed
  • B. D. Banerjee
Article

Abstract

Endosulfan, malathion, and phosphamidon are widely used pesticides. Subchronic exposure to these contaminants commonly affects the central nervous system, immune, gastrointestinal, renal, and reproductive system. There effects have been attributed to increased oxidative stress. This study was conducted to examine the role of oxidative stress in genotoxicity following pesticide exposure using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro. Further possible attenuation of genotoxicity was studied using N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and curcumin as known modulators of oxidative stress. Cultured mononuclear cells was isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers, and exposed to varying concentrations of different pesticides: endosulfan, malathion, and phosphamidon for 6, 12, and 24 h. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by cellular malondialdehyde (MDA) level and DNA damage was quantified by measuring 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) using ELISA. Both MDA and 8-OH-dG were significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner following treatment with these pesticides. There was a significant decrease in MDA and 8-OH-dG levels in PBMC when co-treated with NAC or/and curcumin as compared to pesticide alone. These results indicate that pesticide-induced oxidative stress is probably responsible for the DNA damage, and NAC or curcumin attenuate this effect by counteracting the oxidative stress.

Keywords

Pesticide Lipid peroxidation DNA damage N-acetylcysteine Curcumin 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tanzeel Ahmed
    • 1
  • Rahul Pathak
    • 1
  • MD. Mustafa
    • 1
  • Rajarshi Kar
    • 1
  • Ashok K. Tripathi
    • 1
  • Rafat S. Ahmed
    • 1
  • B. D. Banerjee
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of BiochemistryUniversity College of Medical Sciences and G.T.B. Hospital (University of Delhi)DelhiIndia

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