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Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

, Volume 157, Issue 1–4, pp 97–104 | Cite as

Impact assessment of pesticide residues in fish of Ganga river around Kolkata in West Bengal

  • Md. Wasim Aktar
  • M. Paramasivam
  • Daipayan Sengupta
  • Swarnali Purkait
  • Madhumita Ganguly
  • S. Banerjee
Article

Abstract

An investigation was conducted from 2001 to 2005 for determining the residual concentration of five pesticides, viz., total-HCH, total-DDT, total-Endosulfan, Dimethoate and Malathion in fish samples collected from various points of the river Ganga. Fish samples were analyzed for pesticide residues using standard laboratory procedures by GC method. It was found that total-HCH concentration remains above the MRL values for maximum number of times in comparison to four other pesticides. The pesticide contamination to fish may be due to indiscriminate discharge of polluted and untreated sewage-sludge to the river. The pesticide contents in some places are alarming. Thus proper care, maintenance, treatment and disposal of sewage water and sludge are most vital and should be the prime thrust for the nation.

Keywords

Fish Pesticide residues OC & OP pesticides Gas chromatography Spatial & temporal changes 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Md. Wasim Aktar
    • 1
  • M. Paramasivam
    • 1
  • Daipayan Sengupta
    • 2
  • Swarnali Purkait
    • 2
  • Madhumita Ganguly
    • 2
  • S. Banerjee
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Agricultural ChemicalsBidhan Chandra Krishi ViswavidyalayaNadiaIndia
  2. 2.Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science, Institute of Agricultural ScienceUniversity of CalcuttaKolkataIndia

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