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Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

, Volume 147, Issue 1–3, pp 191–198 | Cite as

Water monitoring and treatment for drinking purposes in 2004 tsunami affected area—Ban Nam Khem, Phang Nga, Thailand

  • Carlo Collivignarelli
  • Prapin Tharnpoophasiam
  • Mentore Vaccari
  • Valentina De Felice
  • Veronica Di Bella
  • Ruchaneekorn Mingkwan
Article

Abstract

University of Brescia and Mahidol University of Bangkok developed a project in Phang Nga province (Thailand), the most damaged by 2004 tsunami. In particular, the study, performed between April and May 2006, dealt with the surface and ground water monitoring in Ban Nam Khem village and the experimental evaluation of possible drinking treatment alternatives. The monitoring highlighted that saline content in the tsunami affected area is decreasing but still very high (conductivity presented values up to 2,600 and 6,230 μS/cm in ground and surface water, respectively); hence, advanced and complicated processes such as reverse osmosis should be adopted to treat such water for drinking purposes. Waiting for ground water salinity to assume acceptable values, activities for the reduction of its organic and microbiological contamination will be started. However, it has to be underlined that the diffusion of drinking water to a greater part of population can be obtained only through the realization of new centralised treatment plants and the improvement of existing ones (serving at the moment about 20% of inhabitants).

Keywords

Drinking water Monitoring Thailand Treatment Tsunami 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlo Collivignarelli
    • 1
  • Prapin Tharnpoophasiam
    • 2
  • Mentore Vaccari
    • 1
  • Valentina De Felice
    • 1
  • Veronica Di Bella
    • 1
  • Ruchaneekorn Mingkwan
    • 3
  1. 1.CeTAmb, Documentation and research centre on appropriate technologies for environment management in developing Countries, Department DICATAUniversity of BresciaBresciaItaly
  2. 2.Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Tropical MedicineMahidol UniversityBangkokThailand
  3. 3.Central Laboratory Unit, Faculty of Tropical MedicineMahidol UniversityBangkokThailand

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