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Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

, Volume 128, Issue 1–3, pp 475–482 | Cite as

Physico-Chemical Characteristics of Some Waters Used for Drinking and Domestic Purposes in the Niger Delta, Nigeria

  • Akpofure Rim-Rukeh
  • Grace O. Ikhifa
  • Peter A. Okokoyo
Article

Abstract

Physico-chemical characteristics of some river and hand-dug well waters used for drinking and domestic purposes in the oil rich Niger Delta area of Nigeria were assessed using standard methods. The concentrations of the parameters in the river water samples ranged in the following order: pH (5.6–6.9), temperature (26.90–28.60°C), turbidity (23–63 NTU), electrical conductivity (52–184 μs/cm), DO (5.4–7.2 mg/l), BOD (21–57 mg/l), TDS (6.0–217 mg/l), PO4 3− (0.19–1.72 mg/l), SO4 2− (25–36.8 mg/l), NO3 (20.3–28 mg/l), Fe (6.07–15.71 mg/l), Zn (0.04–0.24 mg/l), Pb (0.01–0.17 mg/l), Ni (0.01–0.13 mg/l), Vn (0.01–0.20 mg/l) and Hg (0.001–0.002 mg/l). The concentrations of these parameters in the hand-dug well water ranged in the following order: pH (5.7–6.8) temperature (26–30°C), turbidity (134–171 NTU), electrical conductivity (160–340 μs/cm), DO (5.4–6.4 mg/l), BOD (13–34 mg/l), TDS (110–190 mg/l), PO4 3− (0.84–1.84 mg/l), SO4 2− (10.6–28.1 mg/l), NO3 (11.3–23 mg/l), Fe (13.17–16.31 mg/l), Ni (0.01–0.02 mg/l), Vn (0.01–0.04 mg/l) and Hg (0.001–0.004 mg/l). The concentrations of BOD, turbidity, NO3 and Fe in the water samples were above WHO and FMENV permissible limits for safe drinking water. The results suggest that the use of such waters for drinking and domestic purposes pose a serious threat to the health of the users and calls for the intervention of government agencies.

Keywords

River Physico-chemical Well Drinking Domestic 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akpofure Rim-Rukeh
    • 1
  • Grace O. Ikhifa
    • 1
  • Peter A. Okokoyo
    • 2
  1. 1.Integrated Science DepartmentCollege of EducationAgborNigeria
  2. 2.Chemistry DepartmentCollege of EducationAgborNigeria

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