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Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

, Volume 118, Issue 1–3, pp 407–422 | Cite as

The Emissions of Major Aromatic Voc as Landfill Gas from Urban Landfill Sites in Korea

  • Ki-Hyun Kim
  • Sung Ok Baek
  • Ye-Jin Choi
  • Young Sunwoo
  • Eui-Chan Jeon
  • J. H. Hong
Article

Abstract

In this study, concentrations of major aromatic VOCs were determined from landfill gas (LFG) at a total of five municipal landfill sites in Korea including Nan Ji (NJ), Woon Jung (WJ), Sam Poong (SP), Hoei Chun (HC), and No Hyung (NH). The concentration levels of those VOC were found to be significantly different, mainly as a function of such a parameter as landfill aging. The VOC concentrations measured from the unclosed landfill sites (e.g., WJ) were characterized by exceedingly high values above a few tens of ppm. However, the results of the abandoned site (e.g., SP) were about three orders of magnitude lower than the others so as to merely exceed the typical ambient concentration levels. It was most striking to find a systematic dominance of toluene over other aromatic VOC under most circumstances. The LFG flux values of all aromatic VOC and the four specific major ones (termed as BTEX: benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene) were also computed for each vent pipe from all study sites using their concentrations and the concurrently determined environmental parameters. The results, if calculated in terms of the average BTEX quantity emitted per vent pipe, showed that the magnitude of their emissions can vary substantially, with the values ranging from 0.05 (SP) to 49.2 kg yr−1 (WJ in wintertime). The LFG flux values of aromatic VOC, when compared to the contribution of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), were able to explain a constant, but minor, proportion of the LFG carbon budget.

Keywords

aromatic emission flux landfill ventpipe VOC 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ki-Hyun Kim
    • 1
  • Sung Ok Baek
    • 2
  • Ye-Jin Choi
    • 1
  • Young Sunwoo
    • 3
  • Eui-Chan Jeon
    • 1
  • J. H. Hong
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Earth and Environmental SciencesSejong UniversitySeoulKorea
  2. 2.Department of Environmental EngineeringYeungnam UniversityGyeongsanKorea
  3. 3.Department of Environmental EngineeringKonkuk UniversitySeoulKorea
  4. 4.NIERInchonKorea

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