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European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 143, Issue 3, pp 595–605 | Cite as

Development and characterization of the 4th CSISA-spot blotch nursery of bread wheat

  • Pawan K. Singh
  • Yong Zhang
  • Xinyao He
  • Ravi P. Singh
  • Ramesh Chand
  • Vinod K. Mishra
  • Paritosh K. Malaker
  • Mostofa A. Reza
  • Mokhlesur M. Rahman
  • Rabiul Islam
  • Apurba K. Chowdhury
  • Prateek M. Bhattacharya
  • Ishwar K. Kalappanavar
  • José Crossa
  • Arun K. Joshi
Article

Abstract

Spot blotch (SB) caused by Cochliobolus sativus is a serious biotic stress to wheat in warm and humid areas, particularly South Asia (SA). In order to support South Asian farmers to combat SB, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) established an efficient SB screening system at Agua Fria, Mexico and developed a nursery under the project - Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA). The materials used to form CSISA-SB nursery were selected from advanced breeding lines from different wheat breeding programs at CIMMYT. Seed of CSISA-SB nursery was produced at disease-free plots at El Batan and Mexicali, and distributed to SA after rigorous seed health checks. The 4th CSISA-SB, made available in 2012, comprised 50 entries including two resistant and two susceptible checks. The nursery was evaluated in seven locations in Mexico, India, and Bangladesh in the 2012–13 cropping season. The results indicated that although few lines exhibited stable resistance across locations due to strong G × E interaction, promising lines with SB resistance and good agronomy can still be identified in each location. The two most promising lines showing consistent spot blotch resistance across the regions were CHUKUI#1 (CIMMYT germplasm bank identification number, GID 6178575) and VAYI#1 (GID 6279248). These lines could be promoted as sources of SB resistance or directly released as cultivars in SA.

Keywords

Disease screening Resistance Cochliobolus sativus Triticum aestivum 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The helpful assistance of Javier Segura and Francisco Lopez with field trials and Nerida Lozano for her efforts in inoculum preparation is highly acknowledged. Dr. Yong Zhang is grateful to Jiangsu Provincial Department of Education, China for providing the financial support as ‘Jiangsu Government Scholarship for Overseas Studies’. Financial support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and USAID through the CSISA project is gratefully acknowledged.

Supplementary material

10658_2015_712_MOESM1_ESM.doc (136 kb)
ESM 1 (DOC 135 kb)
10658_2015_712_MOESM2_ESM.xlsx (76 kb)
Table S1 (XLSX 76 kb)

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Copyright information

© Koninklijke Nederlandse Planteziektenkundige Vereniging 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pawan K. Singh
    • 1
  • Yong Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xinyao He
    • 1
  • Ravi P. Singh
    • 1
  • Ramesh Chand
    • 3
  • Vinod K. Mishra
    • 3
  • Paritosh K. Malaker
    • 4
  • Mostofa A. Reza
    • 4
  • Mokhlesur M. Rahman
    • 5
  • Rabiul Islam
    • 6
  • Apurba K. Chowdhury
    • 7
  • Prateek M. Bhattacharya
    • 7
  • Ishwar K. Kalappanavar
    • 8
  • José Crossa
    • 1
  • Arun K. Joshi
    • 3
    • 9
  1. 1.International Maize and Wheat Improvemnet Center (CIMMYT)MexicoMexico
  2. 2.Lixiahe Region Institute of Agricultural Sciences of Jiangsu ProvinceYangzhouChina
  3. 3.Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Institute of Agricultural SciencesBanaras Hindu UniversityVaranasiIndia
  4. 4.Wheat Research CentreBangladesh Agricultural Research InstituteDinajpurBangladesh
  5. 5.Regional Agricultural Research StationBangladesh Agricultural Research InstituteJamalpurBangladesh
  6. 6.Regional Agricultural Research StationBangladesh Agricultural Research InstituteJessoreBangladesh
  7. 7.Department of Plant PathologyUttar Banga Krishi Vishwa VidyalayaCoochbeharIndiax
  8. 8.Dr. Sanjaya Rajaram Wheat LaboratoryUniversity of Agricultural SciencesDharwadIndia
  9. 9.CIMMYT South Asia Regional OfficeKathmanduNepal

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