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European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 130, Issue 1, pp 83–95 | Cite as

Morphological and molecular analysis of genetic variability within isolates of Corynespora cassiicola from different hosts

  • Yan-Xiang Qi
  • Xin Zhang
  • Jin-Ji Pu
  • Xiao-Mei Liu
  • Ying Lu
  • He Zhang
  • Hui-Qiang Zhang
  • Yan-Chao Lv
  • Yi-Xian Xie
Article

Abstract

Twenty-two isolates of Corynespora cassiicola obtained from cucumber, papaya, eggplant, tomato, bean, Vigna, sesame and Hevea rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) were analysed by morphological features, the differences of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (rDNA-ITS) region sequence and the inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) technique. Variability of morphological features was observed among the isolates. Pathogenicity tests showed that isolates from different hosts attacked Hevea rubber. Sequences of two outgroup taxa, C. proliferata and C. citricola, were downloaded from GenBank. The phylogenetic trees were constructed by using the rDNA-ITS region sequences from 24 Corynespora spp. isolates. In this analysis, the 24 sequences grouped into two clusters (A and B). Cluster A consists of sequences from all isolates of C. cassiicola; whereas cluster B consists of the two outgroup taxa, C. proliferata and C. citricola. However, the ITS region is conservative, and is not fit for studying differences among isolates. A total of 114 DNA fragments was amplified with 16 ISSR primers, among which 102 were polymorphic (89.5%). A dendrogram was created by the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averaging (UPGMA) analysis, and 22 isolates grouped into three clusters (C, D and E). Cluster C is composed of all of the Hevea rubber isolates, whereas cluster D is composed of nine isolates: four from papaya, five from cucumber, eggplant, bean, vigna and sesame. Cluster E is composed of two isolates from cucumber and tomato. These analyses showed that the genetic diversity was very rich among the tested isolates. There are no correlations between the morphological characteristics or rDNA-ITS region sequences of the 22 isolates and their host or geographical origin, but there is a link between ISSR clusters and their host origins. ISSR markers appear to be useful for intra-species population study in C. cassiicola.

Keywords

Morphology Plant pathogen Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) Corynespora cassiicola 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was financed by grants 2006NKJ-5 from the Ministry of Agriculture, the People’s Republic of China. We thank professors Dingfa Zhang and Ninghai Lu at Henan Institute of Science and Technology for their gift of two cucumber isolates.

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Copyright information

© KNPV 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yan-Xiang Qi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xin Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jin-Ji Pu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiao-Mei Liu
    • 3
  • Ying Lu
    • 1
    • 2
  • He Zhang
    • 1
    • 3
  • Hui-Qiang Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yan-Chao Lv
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yi-Xian Xie
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Monitoring and Control of Tropical Agricultural and Forest Invasive Alien PestsMinistry of AgricultureDanzhouThe People’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Environment and Plant Protection InstituteChinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural SciencesDanzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.College of Environment and Plant ProtectionHainan UniversityDanzhouPeople’s Republic of China

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