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European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 118, Issue 3, pp 295–298 | Cite as

Fruit spot of sweet lime (Citrus limetta) caused by Septoria sp. in Peru

  • Luis A. Álvarez-Bernaola
  • Javier Javier-Alva
  • Antonio Vicent
  • Maela León
  • José García-Jiménez
Short Communication
  • 116 Downloads

Abstract

In 2002, a severe fruit spot of sweet lime (Citrus limetta) was observed in Piura and Lambayeque provinces in northern Peru. Affected fruits showed large oval and sunken lesions, often surrounded by chlorotic haloes. Septoria sp. was isolated from affected fruits. Sweet lime isolates showed larger pycnidia and pycnidiospores than those of Septoria spp. previously described on citrus. In addition, phylogenetic analysis of the ITS sequences clearly separated the sweet lime isolates from S. citri and S. citricola. Isolates were pathogenic to detached sweet lime fruits and the fungus was isolated from lesions on inoculated fruits.

Keywords

Coelomycete Plant pathogen 

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Copyright information

© KNPV 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luis A. Álvarez-Bernaola
    • 1
  • Javier Javier-Alva
    • 2
  • Antonio Vicent
    • 1
  • Maela León
    • 1
  • José García-Jiménez
    • 1
  1. 1.Instituto Agroforestal MediterráneoUniversidad Politécnica de ValenciaValenciaSpain
  2. 2.Departamento de Sanidad VegetalUniversidad Nacional de PiuraPiuraPeru

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