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European Journal of Epidemiology

, Volume 30, Issue 4, pp 349–352 | Cite as

Incidence and prediction of falls in Parkinson’s disease: a prospective cohort study

  • Tatjana Gazibara
  • Tatjana Pekmezovic
  • Darija Kisic-Tepavcevic
  • Marina Svetel
  • Aleksandra Tomic
  • Iva Stankovic
  • Vladimir S. Kostic
Letter to the Editor

Falls represent continuing, disabling and costly problem in Parkinson’s disease (PD) [1]. In a long-term prospective study of PD patients, after 20 years of follow-up, at least one fall occurred in 81 % of participants of whom 23 % sustained a fracture [2]. Fall-related burden in PD has substantial impact on activity limitations, participation restrictions, social isolation or premature mortality [3].

Various studies have indicated that age, longer disease duration, advanced stages of the disease, poor balance, freezing of gait, lower extremity weakness, fear of falling and depression, were independently associated with falling in PD [1]. However, precise quantification of risk for falling in PD is still missing. Previous studies dealing with the risk factors for falls in PD expressed incidence by means of incidence proportions [1]. At the same time, the concept of person-time at risk of falling, that includes individual contribution of observed time during which falls occurred, has...

Keywords

Hamilton Depression Rate Scale Incidence Density Hamilton Anxiety Rate Scale Levodopa Dose Equivalency Incidence Proportion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This investigation was supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Serbia (Grants No 175087 and 175090).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tatjana Gazibara
    • 1
  • Tatjana Pekmezovic
    • 1
  • Darija Kisic-Tepavcevic
    • 1
  • Marina Svetel
    • 2
  • Aleksandra Tomic
    • 2
  • Iva Stankovic
    • 2
  • Vladimir S. Kostic
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for Epidemiology, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of BelgradeBelgradeSerbia
  2. 2.Clinic of Neurology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of BelgradeBelgradeSerbia

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