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Educational Psychology Review

, Volume 18, Issue 4, pp 361–376 | Cite as

Focusing on the Complexity of Emotion Issues in Academic Learning: A Dynamical Component Systems Approach

  • Peter Op ’t Eynde
  • Jeannine E. Turner
Original Article

Abstract

Understanding the interrelations among students’ cognitive, emotional, motivational, and volitional processes is an emergening focus in educational psychology. A dynamical, component systems theory of emotions is presented as a promising framework to further unravel these complex interrelations. This framework considers emotions to be a process that is composed of cognitive, neurophysiological, motor expression, and motivational processes—as well as feelings—that mutually regulate each other over time and within a particular context. This comprehensive view of emotions provides a more complete understanding of the social and dynamical nature of emotions and the integration of emotions within learning processes. Using a dynamical, component systems view of emotional processes, interrelated with learning processes, involves a shift in research methodologies and instruments to adequately investigate the role(s) of emotions within learning contexts. But more importantly, it may provide a powerful framework that can clearly show teachers and parents the role(s) that emotions play in students’ acquisition of knowledge and skills.

Keywords

Emotion Learning Dynamical component systems 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Instructional Psychology and Technology (CIP & T)University of LeuvenLeuvenBelgium
  2. 2.Educational Psychology and Learning SystemsFlorida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

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