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Picture Book Biographies for Young Children: A Way to Teach Multiple Perspectives

  • Hani Morgan
Article

Abstract

In today’s global age, it is important for young students to develop multiple perspectives. Some of the standards that today’s teachers are required to adhere to include an understanding of different cultures. The National Council for the Social Studies, for example, indicates that teachers should provide instruction that complies with various thematic standards which include teaching about global connections and cultural diversity. To encourage young students to develop multiple perspectives, teachers need to pay attention not only to how they teach, but also to what they teach. Educators can guide students to develop cross-cultural understanding at an early age by using well-written picture book biographies which represent people from diverse backgrounds. This article explains what multiple perspectives are and offers resources and strategies for educators that will help young students develop an understanding of the frames of reference that different groups of people hold. It also emphasizes the importance of developing multiple viewpoints at a young age.

Keywords

Biographies Diversity Multiple perspectives Children’s books Multicultural education 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Southern MississippiHattiesburgUSA

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