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Early Childhood Education Journal

, Volume 35, Issue 1, pp 25–31 | Cite as

Facilitating Preschool Learning and Movement through Dance

  • Riolama Lorenzo-Lasa
  • Roger I Ideishi
  • Siobhan K Ideishi
Article

Abstract

A preschool movement through dance program is a way to open the door to numerous cultural benefits and opportunities, and preschool skill facilitation. Creating new contexts for learning enrich young children and offer them different opportunities to understand and negotiate the world. Inclusive curricular integration and parent and community participation are important components of a cultural arts experience that deepen the children’s repertoire of behavior and responses to the world. Early childhood education practitioners are encouraged to creatively explore their community and develop rich cultural learning experiences for children.

Keywords

preschool cultural arts children’s movement programs gross motor development motor development creative preschool movement preschool dance children’s imagination creative expression preschool curricular integration 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Riolama Lorenzo-Lasa
    • 1
  • Roger I Ideishi
    • 1
  • Siobhan K Ideishi
    • 1
  1. 1.Occupational TherapyUniversity of the Sciences in PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaUSA

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