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Environmental Biology of Fishes

, Volume 90, Issue 3, pp 287–299 | Cite as

Discriminant analysis as a tool to identify catfish (Ariidae) species of the excavated archaeological otoliths

  • Weizhong Chen
  • Mohsen Al-Husaini
  • Mark Beech
  • Khlood Al-Enezi
  • Sara Rajab
  • Hanan Husain
Article

Abstract

Catfish otoliths excavated from two archaeological sites in Kuwait, Sabiyah (ca. 7000 Years Before Present) and Al-Khidr, ca. 4000 YBP, were compared with those of Kuwait’s modern catfish. Otoliths from Kuwait’s four species of catfish, Netuma bilineata, N. thalassina, Plicofollis dussumieri, and P. tenuispinis were collected after recording total length and weight. Data recorded for both ancient and modern otoliths, including annual ring (age), weight, length and four otolith radii from transverse sections, were subject to discriminant analysis to differentiate among species and develop classification functions for otoliths. Comparisons of the results from the ancient and modern otoliths showed that most of the excavated otoliths (78% from Sabiyah and 100% from Al-Khidr) belong to the two presently dominate species N. bilineata and P. tenuispinis, indicating that ichthyofauna of Kuwait Bay may not have changed much in the past 7000 years.

Keywords

Catfish Species identification Otolith Discriminant analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The study described in this manuscript was part of the project “Comparative Study of Ancient and Modern Otoliths of Ariidae (Sea Catfish) From Kuwait Waters” which was supported jointly by the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Sciences (KFAS) and the National Council for Culture, Arts and Letters (NCCAL), and the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (KISR). Sincere gratitude is extended to all the team members of the project and also to Zora Miklíková, member of the Kuwaiti-Slovak Archaeological Mission to Failakah Island, for otoliths from the Al-Khidr site, to James M. Bishop for reviewing this manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Weizhong Chen
    • 1
  • Mohsen Al-Husaini
    • 1
  • Mark Beech
    • 2
  • Khlood Al-Enezi
    • 3
  • Sara Rajab
    • 1
  • Hanan Husain
    • 1
  1. 1.Mariculture and Fisheries DepartmentKuwait Institute for Scientific ResearchSafatKuwait
  2. 2.Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture and HeritageAbu DhabiUnited Arab Emirates
  3. 3.Kuwait National MuseumNational Council for Culture, Arts and LettersKuwait cityKuwait

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