The effect of flipped learning on EFL students’ writing performance, autonomy, and motivation

Abstract

Though flipped learning has positively impacted teaching English writing, its usefulness in developing students’ English writing performance, autonomy, and motivation is still unclear. This study aimed at investigating the effects of using flipped learning on students’ English writing performance, autonomy, and motivation in learning English writing. It also addressed the factors available in the flipped learning English writing environment that contribute to this effect. Fifteen male and female third-year students in the English department, University of Anbar-Iraq were purposively selected to participate in writing three writing tasks. A qualitative case study research design was used where triangulation of pre-and post-study writing tasks, post-study interview, diaries, and observation was implemented. Data were analyzed qualitatively using content and thematic analysis. Findings indicated that this learning environment has an impact on promoting students’ English writing performance, autonomy, and motivation. Besides, findings revealed that the interactive nature of the learning environment, time and place flexibility, teacher and peers’ feedback, and many learning sources were the main factors that help students improve their English writing performance, autonomy, and motivation. The study concluded that flipping the English writing classes created a user-friendly collaborative learning environment due to the much language and writing knowledge gained. As a result, students’ English writing performance, autonomy, and motivation were enhanced as learners became able to practice writing comfortably.

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Correspondence to Alaá Ismael Challob.

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Challob, A.I. The effect of flipped learning on EFL students’ writing performance, autonomy, and motivation. Educ Inf Technol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10639-021-10434-1

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Keywords

  • Flipped learning
  • Students’ autonomy
  • Students’ motivation
  • EFL writing