Integration of information and communication technology in teaching: Initial perspectives of senior high school teachers in Ghana

Abstract

The study examined the Integration of Information and Communication Technology in teaching in Senior High Schools. The study focused on the Kumasi Girls Senior High School in Ghana. The study had two objectives. The first objective examined the extent to which the attitude of teachers influences the integration of ICT in teaching. The second objective examined the gender differences in the integration of ICT in Senior High Schools. A descriptive survey design and quantitative approach were adopted for the study, descriptive statistics using means and inferential statistics using standard regression were used for analysing the data. Hypotheses were developed using the diffusion of innovation theory. Data was collected through self-administered questionnaires which were distributed to the study population. The testing of hypothesis was made possible through the use of structured equation modelling. Findings revealed that teachers’ attitude had a significant positive relationship with ICT integration. The study further concluded that there was no significant difference in gender acceptance of ICT integration in teaching.

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Correspondence to Valentina Arkorful.

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Arkorful, V., Barfi, K.A. & Aboagye, I.K. Integration of information and communication technology in teaching: Initial perspectives of senior high school teachers in Ghana. Educ Inf Technol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10639-020-10426-7

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Keywords

  • Integration
  • Gender
  • ICT
  • Teaching
  • Learning
  • Structural equation modelling