Education and Information Technologies

, Volume 23, Issue 1, pp 129–142 | Cite as

Learning orientations of IT higher education students in UAE University

  • Nabeel Al-Qirim
  • Ali Tarhini
  • Kamel Rouibah
  • Serhani Mohamd
  • Aishah Rashid Yammahi
  • Maraim Ahmed Yammahi
Article
  • 128 Downloads

Abstract

This research examines the learning preferences of students in UAE University (UAEU). The uniqueness of this research emanates from the fact that no prior research examined this area from the UAE’s perspective. Thus, this research embarks on the fact that student learning strategies vary from one country to another due to many factors. This research utilizes six learning strategies extended from the literature and attempts to examine their importance on UAEU students using survey research. The selected learning strategies were students” motivation, time-poorness, mastery effort, assessment focus, competitiveness, and listening. This research provided interesting insights and contrasts pertaining to the learning strategies of UAEU students. Implications are discussed highlighting different theoretical as well as professional contributions and contentions and portrayed a path where pending issues could be addressed by future research.

Keywords

Learning strategies Motivation Mastery effort Assessment focus Time-poorness Competitiveness Listening UAE university 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nabeel Al-Qirim
    • 1
  • Ali Tarhini
    • 2
  • Kamel Rouibah
    • 3
  • Serhani Mohamd
    • 1
  • Aishah Rashid Yammahi
    • 1
  • Maraim Ahmed Yammahi
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Information TechnologyUnited Arab Emirates UniversityAl-AinUnited Arab Emirates
  2. 2.Sultan Qaboos UniversityMuscatOman
  3. 3.Kuwait UniversityKuwait CityKuwait

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