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Investigational New Drugs

, Volume 30, Issue 4, pp 1756–1760 | Cite as

Safety of bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg infusion over 10 minutes in NSCLC patients

  • Olivier Mir
  • Jérôme Alexandre
  • Romain Coriat
  • Stanislas Ropert
  • Pascaline Boudou-Rouquette
  • Thach Bui
  • Jeanne Chapron
  • Jean-Philippe Durand
  • Daniel Dusser
  • François Goldwasser
SHORT REPORT

Summary

Background Bevacizumab is a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody against VEGF. Because infusion-related hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) are a concern with monoclonal antibodies, initial phase 1 trials used a 90-, 60-, then 30-min initial infusion sequence. We evaluated the impact of a shortened bevacizumab infusion (10 min) on toxicity in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Patients and methods Consecutive patients with stage IV NSCLC eligible for anti-VEGF therapy received a platinum doublet plus bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg infused over 10 min, every 3 weeks, in the outpatient setting. Blood pressure was monitored at home twice daily, and other toxicities (HSRs and proteinuria) were monitored at each treatment administration. Results Bevacizumab was given as a 10 min infusion in 55 patients (group A), and using the standard sequence in another 36 patients (group B). Hypertension (grade ≥2) was observed in 18/55 (32.7%) patients in group A and 13/36 (38.9%) patients in group B (p = 0.77). Similarly, no difference was seen regarding the incidence of grade ≥2 proteinuria (12.7% vs. 19.4%, p = 0.39), arterial thrombo-embolic events (0 in each group) or venous thromboembolic events (1.8% vs. 8.3%, p = 0.29). Conclusions Our data suggest that bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg can be safely infused over 10 min in unselected NSCLC patients despite their cardio-vascular and respiratory comorbidities, saving time for both patients and caregivers.

Keywords

Bevacizumab NSCLC VEGF-A Angiogenesis inhibitors Hypertension 

Notes

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olivier Mir
    • 1
    • 3
  • Jérôme Alexandre
    • 1
  • Romain Coriat
    • 1
  • Stanislas Ropert
    • 1
  • Pascaline Boudou-Rouquette
    • 1
  • Thach Bui
    • 2
  • Jeanne Chapron
    • 2
  • Jean-Philippe Durand
    • 1
  • Daniel Dusser
    • 2
  • François Goldwasser
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical OncologyCERIA (Centre for Research on Angiogenesis Inhibitors)ParisFrance
  2. 2.Department of Pneumology, Cochin Teaching Hospital, AP-HPUniversité Paris DescartesParisFrance
  3. 3.CERIA, Department of Medical Oncology, Cochin Teaching Hospital, AP-HPUniversité Paris DescartesParisFrance

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