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Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 61, Issue 6, pp 1635–1640 | Cite as

Corticosteroid Use in a Prospective, Community-Based Cohort of Newly Diagnosed Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

  • Jason M. Shapiro
  • Sarah E. Hagin
  • Samir A. Shah
  • Renee Bright
  • Meaghan Law
  • Heather Moniz
  • Julie Giacalone
  • Taylor Jackvony
  • Sasha Taleban
  • Zahid Samad
  • Marjorie Merrick
  • Bruce E. Sands
  • Neal S. LeLeiko
Original Article

Abstract

Background

Systemic corticosteroids (CS) are a mainstay of treatment for patients with newly diagnosed inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Previous population-based studies report CS exposure rates range from 39 to 75 % within the first year of diagnosis with surgical resection rates as high as 13–18 % in the same time frame. These reports represent an older cohort of patients enrolled over prolonged periods of time and do not necessarily reflect current treatment approaches. We examine CS use during the first year of IBD diagnosis in a community-based, inception cohort.

Methods

Data were derived from the Ocean State Crohn’s and Colitis Area Registry (OSCCAR), a prospective inception cohort of IBD patients who are residents of Rhode Island.

Results

A total of 272 patients were included in the current analyses. Overall, 60 % of Crohn’s disease and 57 % of ulcerative colitis patients were exposed to at least one course of CS during year 1 of study enrollment. Most notably, only 2 % of patients (n = 5) required a surgical resection.

Conclusions

In this community-based cohort, 59 % of patients were exposed to at least one course of CS during their first year of enrollment. In contrast to previous studies, OSCCAR represents a more modern cohort of patients. While steroid exposure rates were similar or slightly higher than those in previous reports, we observed a low rate of surgical resection. As our cohort ages, future analysis will focus on the role more contemporary agents may play on the low rates of surgery we observed.

Keywords

Inflammatory bowel disease Crohn’s disease Ulcerative colitis Corticosteroids Surgical resections 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This project was supported by a Grant from the CCFA through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (1 UO1 DP004785-01). The findings and conclusions are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors have no relevant conflicts to disclose.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jason M. Shapiro
    • 1
    • 3
  • Sarah E. Hagin
    • 2
    • 3
  • Samir A. Shah
    • 3
    • 4
  • Renee Bright
    • 5
  • Meaghan Law
    • 5
  • Heather Moniz
    • 5
  • Julie Giacalone
    • 6
  • Taylor Jackvony
    • 1
  • Sasha Taleban
    • 3
    • 5
  • Zahid Samad
    • 7
  • Marjorie Merrick
    • 8
  • Bruce E. Sands
    • 6
  • Neal S. LeLeiko
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Liver DiseasesHasbro Children’s Hospital/Rhode Island HospitalProvidenceUSA
  2. 2.Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, the Department of PsychiatryHasbro Children’s Hospital/Rhode Island HospitalProvidenceUSA
  3. 3.The Warren Alpert School of Medicine at Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  4. 4.Gastroenterology Associates, Inc.ProvidenceUSA
  5. 5.Division of GastroenterologyRhode Island HospitalProvidenceUSA
  6. 6.Dr. Henry D. Janowitz Division of GastroenterologyIcahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiNew YorkUSA
  7. 7.Centers for Disease Control and PreventionNational Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health PromotionAtlantaGeorgia
  8. 8.Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of AmericaNew YorkUSA

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