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Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 59, Issue 11, pp 2704–2713 | Cite as

Molecular Mechanism of Acute Radiation Enteritis Revealed Using Proteomics and Biological Signaling Network Analysis in Rats

  • Shunxin Song
  • Dianke Chen
  • Tenghui Ma
  • Yanxin Luo
  • Zuli Yang
  • Daohai Wang
  • Xinjuan Fan
  • Qiyuan Qin
  • Beibei Ni
  • Xuefeng Guo
  • Zhenyu Xian
  • Ping Lan
  • Xinping Cao
  • Mingtao Li
  • Jianping Wang
  • Lei Wang
Original Article

Abstract

Background and Aims

Radiation enteritis (RE) has emerged as a significant complication that can progress to severe gastrointestinal disease and the mechanisms underlying its genesis remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify temporal changes in protein expression potentially associated with acute inflammation and to elucidate the mechanism underlying radiation enteritis genesis.

Methods

Male Sprague–Dawley rats were irradiated in the abdomen with a single dose of 10 Gy to establish an in vivo model of acute radiation enteritis. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight spectrometer (MALDI-TOF) tandem mass spectrometry, and peptide mass fingerprinting were used to determine differentially expressed proteins between normal and inflamed intestinal mucosa. Additionally, differentially expressed proteins were evaluated by KO Based Annotation System to find the biological functions associated with acute radiation enteritis.

Results

Intensity changes of 86 spots were detected with statistical significance (ratio ≥ 1.5 or ≤ 1.5, P < 0.05). Sixty one of the 86 spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. These radiation-induced proteins with biological functions showed that the FAS pathway and glycolysis signaling pathways were significantly altered using the KOBAS tool.

Conclusions

Our results reveal an underlying mechanism of radiation-induced acute enteritis, which may help clarify the pathogenesis of RE and point to potential targets for therapeutic interventions.

Keywords

Radiation enteritis Proteomics Signaling network Molecular mechanisms 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was partly supported by the Guangdong Provincial Key Scientific Research Grants (10251008901000008, L Wang), the National Natural Scientific Foundation of China Grants (81072042, L Wang; 81172040, JP Wang), and grants by ”985 project” of Sun Yat-Sen University and Guangdong Translational Medicine Public Platform (4202037) and Sun Yat-Sen Graduate Innovative Personnel Training Funded Projects (Shunxin Song and Jianping Wang). We thank Ms. Biyan Lu, Peihuang Wu, Dr. Kunhua Hu and Chuangyu Wen for their laboratory assistance.

Conflict of interest

The authors report no conflicts of interest. The authors alone are responsible for the content and writing of the paper.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shunxin Song
    • 1
    • 2
    • 6
  • Dianke Chen
    • 1
    • 4
  • Tenghui Ma
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yanxin Luo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zuli Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Daohai Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xinjuan Fan
    • 1
  • Qiyuan Qin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Beibei Ni
    • 1
  • Xuefeng Guo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhenyu Xian
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ping Lan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xinping Cao
    • 5
  • Mingtao Li
    • 3
  • Jianping Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lei Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Gastrointestinal Institute of Sun Yat-Sen UniversityThe Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen UniversityGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of Colorectal Surgery, Gastrointestinal Institute of Sun Yat-Sen UniversityThe Sixth Affiliated Hospital (Gastrointestinal and Anal Hospital) of Sun Yat-Sen UniversityGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Department of Pharmacology and Proteomics Center, Zhongshan School of MedicineSun Yat-Sen UniversityGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.Department of Medical OncologyThe Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen UniversityGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  5. 5.Department of Radiation OncologyState Key Laboratory of Oncology in South ChinaGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  6. 6.Department of Colorectal SurgeryThe First People’s Hospital of ChenzhouChenzhouPeople’s Republic of China

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