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Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 58, Issue 4, pp 1004–1009 | Cite as

Fat Mass and Obesity-Associated Gene Enhances Oxidative Stress and Lipogenesis in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

  • Jianjin Guo
  • Wei Ren
  • Aimei Li
  • Ying Ding
  • Wanhua Guo
  • Dongming Su
  • Cheng Hu
  • Kuanfeng Xu
  • Heng Chen
  • Xinyu Xu
  • Tao Yang
  • Weiping Jia
Original Article

Abstract

Background and Aim

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is strongly associated with obesity, hyperlipidemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Several studies have found that fat mass and the obesity-associated (FTO) gene is linked to obesity. The aim of this work is to investigate the expression and function of FTO in liver with lipid metabolism diseases.

Methods

We investigated the basal FTO expression in an NAFLD rat model and compared it with control subjects. The function of FTO in lipid metabolism was further studied in L02 cells through overexpression experiments.

Results

A significant increase in FTO mRNA and protein levels was found in the NAFLD group. In addition, the FTO levels were positively associated with malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase concentrations. FTO overexpression in L02 cells enhanced lipogenesis and oxidative stress.

Conclusions

This study demonstrates that increased FTO levels in the liver are involved in oxidative stress and lipid deposition, which characterize NAFLD.

Keywords

Fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) Oxidative stress Lipogenesis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (30971405, 81170252, 81070656), the National Basic Research Program of China (2010CB535008, 973 Program), Medical Academic Key Talent Program of Jiangsu Province in China (2007200), the Jiangsu Province Innovation Project for Graduate Students of China (CXZZ11_0708), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2012M510850) and Shanghai Postdoctoral Sustentation Fund (12R21414700).

Conflict of interest

None.

Supplementary material

10620_2012_2516_MOESM1_ESM.doc (822 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 821 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jianjin Guo
    • 1
  • Wei Ren
    • 2
  • Aimei Li
    • 3
    • 4
  • Ying Ding
    • 3
  • Wanhua Guo
    • 4
  • Dongming Su
    • 3
  • Cheng Hu
    • 2
  • Kuanfeng Xu
    • 1
  • Heng Chen
    • 1
  • Xinyu Xu
    • 1
  • Tao Yang
    • 1
  • Weiping Jia
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of EndocrinologyThe First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical UniversityNanjingChina
  2. 2.Shanghai Key Laboratory of Diabetes Mellitus, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Diabetes Institute, Shanghai Clinical Center for DiabetesShanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s HospitalShanghaiChina
  3. 3.The Center of Metabolic Disease ResearchNanjing Medical UniversityNanjingChina
  4. 4.Department of Nuclear Medicine, Gulou HospitalMedical College of Nanjing UniversityNanjingChina

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