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Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 55, Issue 10, pp 2767–2769 | Cite as

Endoscopic Management of a Spontaneous Gallbladder Perforation and Bile Leak

  • Craig Munroe
  • Amie E. Padilla-Thornton
  • George Triadafilopoulos
  • Jacques Van Dam
  • Glen Lutchman
Stanford Multidisciplinary Seminars
  • 101 Downloads

Case Presentation and Evolution

A 53-year-old man with a past medical history of alcoholic liver disease complicated by esophageal varices, ascites, hepatic hydrothorax, and hepatic encephalopathy presented to a local community hospital with 10-day history of abdominal pain. His pain was 10/10 in intensity, constant, worse in the supine position, increasing on the dependant side of the abdomen (when lying on the left side, the pain worse on left and vice versa), and improved in the upright position. The pain was not worsened by food and was not associated with fevers, chills, nausea or chest pain. He also reported shortness of breath and diarrhea, but denied rectal bleeding.

When he was admitted to the local hospital, his white blood cell (WBC) count was 15,000/mm3, predominantly bands and neutrophils. Because of concern for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, empiric antibiotics were started and a nasogastric tube was placed. An abdominal ultrasound revealed a cirrhotic liver and a...

Keywords

Perforation Hepatic Encephalopathy Acute Cholecystitis Bile Leak Pantoprazole 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Craig Munroe
    • 1
  • Amie E. Padilla-Thornton
    • 2
  • George Triadafilopoulos
    • 1
  • Jacques Van Dam
    • 1
  • Glen Lutchman
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of MedicineStanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University Medical CenterStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyStanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University Medical CenterStanfordUSA

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