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Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 54, Issue 8, pp 1772–1777 | Cite as

Influence of Visfatin on Histopathological Changes of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

  • R. Aller
  • D. A. de Luis
  • O. Izaola
  • M. Gonzalez Sagrado
  • R. Conde
  • M. C. Velasco
  • T. Alvarez
  • D. Pacheco
  • J. M. González
Original Article

Abstract

Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common liver disease. The aim of the present study was to explore the relation of visfatin with underlying histopathological changes of NAFLD patients. Subjects A population of 55 NAFLD patients was analyzed in a cross-sectional study. A liver biopsy was realized. Weight, basal glucose, insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA), total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and visfatin levels were measured. A bioimpedance was performed. Results and conclusions The mean age was 42.8 ± 11.2 years, the mean BMI was 33.1 ± 10.2 with 37 males (67.3%) and 18 females (32.7%). Probabilities to have; portal inflammation increased 1.11 (CI95%:1.03–1.50) with each increment of 1 ng/ml of visfatin concentration, high grade of steatosis increased 1.25 (CI 95%:1.06–1.61) with each unit of insulin concentrations, fibrosis increased 1.12 (CI 95%:1.02–1.43) with each unit of fat mass and lobulillar inflammation increased 13.4 (CI 95%:1.3–147) with each unit of HOMA-IR. Portal inflammation frequencies were different between groups (low visfatin group 13.07 < ng/ml: 37.5% versus high visfatin group 13.07 > ng/ml: 62.5%; P < 0.05). In conclusion, several histopathological changes in liver biopsies could be explained by insulin concentrations, HOMA-IR, and fat mass amount. Moreover, visfatin plasma concentrations could predict the presence of portal inflammation in NAFLD patients.

Keywords

Adipose tissue Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease Obesity Visfatin 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Aller
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. A. de Luis
    • 1
  • O. Izaola
    • 1
  • M. Gonzalez Sagrado
    • 1
  • R. Conde
    • 1
  • M. C. Velasco
    • 1
  • T. Alvarez
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. Pacheco
    • 1
  • J. M. González
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Medicine School and Unit of InvestigationHospital Rio Hortega, University of ValladolidSimancas, ValladolidSpain
  2. 2.Institute of Endocrinology and NutritionHospital Clinico Universitario ValladolidValladolidSpain

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