Advertisement

Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 53, Issue 11, pp 2904–2908 | Cite as

Mannan-binding Lectin (MBL) Polymorphism and Gastric Cancer Risk in Japanese Population

  • Fang-Yu Wang
  • Tomomitsu Tahara
  • Tomiyasu Arisawa
  • Tomoyuki Shibata
  • Hiromi Yamashita
  • Masakatsu Nakamura
  • Daisuke Yoshioka
  • Masaaki Okubo
  • Naoko Maruyama
  • Toshiaki Kamano
  • Yoshio Kamiya
  • Masahiko Nakamura
  • Hiroshi Fujita
  • Mitsuo Nagasaka
  • Masami Iwata
  • Kazuya Takahama
  • Makoto Watanabe
  • Hiroshi Nakano
  • Ichiro Hirata
Original Paper

Abstract

Background Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is believed to be an important constituent of the innate immune system. It has been reported that the codon 54 G/A polymorphism of exon-1 affects the MBL2 gene and alters its activity. Aims We investigated the association between polymorphism of the MBL2 gene and gastric cancer risk as well as Helicobacter pylori infection in a Japanese population. Methods The study cohort comprised 388 gastric cancer patients and 144 healthy volunteers. Polymorphism at codon 54 of exon 1 of the MBL2 gene was investigated by PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results There was no significant difference in the distribution of the MBL2 genotype among the gastric cancer patients and healthy controls. However, the carrier of the A allele was more prevalent among patients with a more advanced stage gastric cancer [odds ratio (OR) 1.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05–2.67; P = 0.03] and also had an increased risk of gastric cancer among patients 65 years of age or younger (OR = 1.6, 95%CI = 1.01–2.52, <0.05). Conclusion The codon 54 polymorphism of the MBL2 gene is associated with more advanced phenotypes of gastric cancer and the risk of gastric cancer in Japanese patients 65 years of age or younger.

Keywords

Gastric cancer Helicobacter pylori Mannan-binding lectin Polymorphism 

References

  1. 1.
    NIH Consensus Conference (1992) Helicobacter pylori in peptic ulcer disease NIH consensus development panel on helicobacter pylori in peptic ulcer disease. JAMA 272:65–69Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Uemura N, Okamoto S, Yamamoto S, Matsumura N, Yamaguchi S, Yamakido M, Taniyama K, Sasaki N, Schlemper RJ (2001) Helicobacter pylori infection and the development of gastric cancer. N Engl J Med 345:784–789PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Parsonnet J, Friedman GD, Vandersteen DP, Chang Y, Vogelman JH, Orentreich N, Sibley RK (1991) Helicobacter pylori infection and the risk of gastric carcinoma. N Engl J Med 325:1127–1131PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Huang JQ, Sridhar S, Chen Y, Hunt RH (1998) Meta-analysis of the relationship between Helicobacter pylori seropositivity and gastric cancer. Gastroenterology 114:1169–1179PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Blaser MJ, Parsonnet J (1994) Parasitism by the “slow” bacterium Helicobacter pylori leads to altered gastric homeostasis and neoplasia. J Clin Invest 94:4–8PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Turner MW, Hamvas RMJ (2000) Mannose-binding lectin: structure, function, genetics and disease associations. Rev Immunogenet 2:305–322PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Proulx F, Wagner E, Toledano B, Decaluwe H, Seidman EG, Rivard GE (2003) Mannan-binding lectin in children with Escherichia coli O157:H7 haemmorrhagic colitis and haemolytic uraemic syndrome. Clin Exp Immunol 133:360–363PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Neth O, Jack DL, Dodds AW, Holzel H, Klein NJ, Turner MW (2000) Mannose-binding lectin binds to a range of clinically relevant microorganisms and promotes complement deposition. Infect Immun 68:688–693PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Fujita T (2002) Evolution of the lectin-complement pathway and its role in innate immunity. Nat Rev Immunol 2:346–353PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Turner MW (2003) The role of mannose-binding lectin in health and disease. Mol Immunol 40:423–429PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Koch A, Melbye M, Sørensen P, Homøe P, Madsen HO, Mølbak K, Hansen CH, Andersen LH, Hahn GW, Garred P (2001) Acute respiratory tract infections and mannose-binding lectin insufficiency during early childhood. J Am Med Assoc 285:1316–1321CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Ahmad T, Tamboli CP, Jewell D, Colombel JF (2004) Clinical relevance of advances in genetics and pharmacogenetics of IBD. Gastroenterology 126:1533–1549PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Bak-Romaniszyn L, Cedzynski M, Szemraj J, St Swierzko A, Zeman K, Kaluzynski A, Planeta-Malecka I (2006) Mannnan-binding lectin in children with chronic gastritis. Scand J Immunol 63:131–135PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Baccarelli A, Hou L, Chen J, Lissowska J, El-Omar EM, Grillo P, Giacomini SM, Yaeger M, Bernig T, Zatonski W, Fraumeni JF Jr, Chanock SJ, Chow WH (2006) Mannose-binding lectin-2 genetic variation and stomach cancer risk. Int J Cancer 119:1970–1975PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Scudiero O, Nardone G, Omodei D, Tatangelo F, Vitale DF, Salvatore F, Castaldo G (2006) A mannose-binding lectin-defective haplotype is a risk factor for gastric cancer. Clin Chem 52:1625–1627PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Sumiya M, Super M, Tabona P, Levinsky RJ, Arai T, Turner MW, Summerfield JA (1991) Molecular basis of opsonic defect in immunodeficient children. Lancet 337:1569–1570PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Lipscombe RJ, Sumiya M, Hill AV, Lau YL, Levinsky RJ, Summerfield JA, Turner MW (1992) High frequencies in African and non-African populations of independent mutations in the mannose binding protein gene. Hum Mol Genet 9:709–715CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Garred P, Larsen F, Madsen HO, Koch C (2003) Mannose-binding lectin deficiency–revisited. Mol Immunol 40:73–84PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Lipscombe RJ, Beatty DW, Ganczakowski M, Goddard EA, Jenkins T, Lau YL, Spurdle AB, Sumiya M, Summerfield JA, Turner MW (1996) Mutations in the human mannose-binding protein gene: frequencies in several population groups. Eur J Hum Genet 4:13–19PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Matsushita M, Hijikata M, Ohta Y, Iwata K, Matsumoto M, Nakao K, Kanai K, Yoshida N, Baba K, Mishiro S (1998) Hepatitis C virus infection and mutations of mannose-binding lectin gene MBL. Arch Virol 143:645–651PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Tsutsumi A, Sasaki K, Wakamiya N, Ichikawa K, Atsumi T, Ohtani K, Suzuki Y, Koike T, Sumida T (2001) Mannose-binding lectin gene: polymorphisms in Japanese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and Sjögren’s syndrome. Genes Immun 2:99–104PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Gomi K, Tokue Y, Kobayashi T, Takahashi H, Watanabe A, Fujita T, Nukiwa T (2004) Mannose-binding lectin gene polymorphism is a modulating factor in repeated respiratory infections. Chest 126:95–99PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Lauren P (1965) The two histological main types of gastric carcinoma: diffuse and so-called intestinal-type carcinoma. An attempt at a histo-clinical classification. Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand 64:31–49PubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Madsen HO, Garred P, Kurtzhals JA, Lamm LU, Ryder LP, Thiel S, Svejgaard A (1994) A new frequent allele is the missing link in the structural polymorphism of the human mannan-binding protein. Immunogenetics 40:37–44PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Super M, Thiel S, Lu J, Levinsky RJ, Turner MW (1989) Association of low levels of mannan-binding protein with a common defect of opsonisation. Lancet 25:1236–1239CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Summerfield JA, Ryder S, Sumiya M, Thursz M, Gorchein A, Monteil MA, Turner MW (1995) Mannose binding protein gene mutations associated with unusual and severe infections in adults. Lancet 345:886–889PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Turner MW (2003) Role of mannose-binding lectin in health and disease. Mol Immunol 40:423–429PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Larsen F, Madsen HO, Sim RB, Koch C, Garred P (2004) Disease-associated mutations in human mannose-binding lectin compromise oligomerization and activity of the final protein. J Biol Chem 279:21302–21311PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Boniotto M, Braida L, Baldas V, Not T, Ventura A, Vatta S, Radillo O, Tedesco F, Percopo S, Montico M, Amoroso A, Crovella S (2005) Evidence of a correlation between mannose binding lectin and celiac disease: a model for other autoimmune diseases. J Mol Med 83:308–315PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Ohlenschlaeger T, Garred P, Madsen HO, Jacobsen S (2004) Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and the risk of arterial thrombosis in systemic lupus erythematosus. N Engl J Med 351:260–267PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    Wang FY, Arisawa T, Tahara T, Nagasaka M, Fujita H, Hirata I, Nakano H (2008) The role of Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) gene polymorphism in ulcerative colitis. J Clin Biochem Nutr 42:54–58PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fang-Yu Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tomomitsu Tahara
    • 1
  • Tomiyasu Arisawa
    • 1
  • Tomoyuki Shibata
    • 1
  • Hiromi Yamashita
    • 1
  • Masakatsu Nakamura
    • 1
  • Daisuke Yoshioka
    • 1
  • Masaaki Okubo
    • 1
  • Naoko Maruyama
    • 1
  • Toshiaki Kamano
    • 1
  • Yoshio Kamiya
    • 1
  • Masahiko Nakamura
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Fujita
    • 1
  • Mitsuo Nagasaka
    • 1
  • Masami Iwata
    • 1
  • Kazuya Takahama
    • 1
  • Makoto Watanabe
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Nakano
    • 1
    • 3
  • Ichiro Hirata
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GastroenterologyFujita Health University School of MedicineKutsukake-cho, ToyoakeJapan
  2. 2.Department of Gastroenterology, Jinling HospitalNanjing University School of MedicineNanjingChina
  3. 3.Fujita Health University School of MedicineKutsukake-cho, ToyoakeJapan

Personalised recommendations