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Cytotechnology

, Volume 70, Issue 4, pp 1121–1129 | Cite as

Combination of temperature shift and hydrolysate addition regulates anti-IgE monoclonal antibody charge heterogeneity in Chinese hamster ovary cell fed-batch culture

  • Chen Zheng
  • Chao Zhuang
  • Jinyan Qin
  • Yantian Chen
  • Qiang Fu
  • Hui Qian
  • Tong Wu
  • Yanchao Wang
  • Xiang Wu
  • Nianmin Qi
Original Article
  • 97 Downloads

Abstract

Charge heterogeneity has been broadly studied as a critical quality attribute during monoclonal antibody (mAb) production that may subsequently affect product stability and biopotency. However, the charge variation distribution is poorly controlled, so methods of more effective control need to be explored. In this study, the combined effects of temperature shift (37–34, 37–32, or 37–30 °C) and hydrolysate addition (0.100 g/L) to culture feed on the charge heterogeneity of anti-IgE mAb were investigated. The results showed that the distribution of charge variation was significantly regulated by the combination of hydrolysate addition with a highly sub-physiological temperature (34 °C). In addition, under this condition, the main peak content significantly increased, and the acidic peak content significantly decreased. Furthermore, we explored Lys variant content, which is the major basic variant content, as well as its relationship with temperature shift and hydrolysate addition. Lys variant levels were positively related to the Lys and Arg concentrations in the medium and negatively related to carboxypeptidase B and carboxypeptidase H transcript levels. The combination of temperature shift and hydrolysate addition can thus effectively improve anti-IgE mAb charge heterogeneity and significantly increase main variant levels and decrease acidic variant levels.

Keywords

Carboxypeptidase Charge heterogeneity Lysine variants Temperature 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (Nos. 14431903100, 17431905800).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chen Zheng
    • 1
  • Chao Zhuang
    • 1
  • Jinyan Qin
    • 2
    • 4
  • Yantian Chen
    • 1
  • Qiang Fu
    • 2
  • Hui Qian
    • 2
  • Tong Wu
    • 1
  • Yanchao Wang
    • 1
  • Xiang Wu
    • 2
  • Nianmin Qi
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Cell Culture and Bioprocess Engineering Lab, School of PharmacyShanghai Jiao Tong UniversityShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Shanghai Taiyin Biotech Co., Ltd.ShanghaiChina
  3. 3.School of Life SciencesZhejiang Sci-Tech UniversityHangzhouChina
  4. 4.School of PharmacyWuhan UniversityWuhanChina

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