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Cytotechnology

, Volume 67, Issue 4, pp 721–725 | Cite as

Kibizu concentrated liquid suppresses the accumulation of lipid droplets in 3T3-L1 cells

  • Chisato Inoue
  • Tomomi Kozaki
  • Yukiko Morita
  • Bungo Shirouchi
  • Katsuya Fukami
  • Kuniyoshi Shimizu
  • Masao Sato
  • Yoshinori Katakura
JAACT Special Issue
  • 128 Downloads

Abstract

Adipocyte size is closely related to the occurrence of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and insulin resistance. Thus, researchers are searching for active substances that function to reduce adipocyte size. In the present study, we focused on sugar cane vinegar, Kibizu, and evaluated the function of Kibizu to reduce adipocyte size by using an in vitro model system, because people in Amami Oshima famous for longevity regularly consume Kibizu. Results showed that Kibizu treatment significantly reduced the size and number of lipid droplets in 3T3-L1 cells, relative to treatment with Kurozu, another traditional vinegar. Results of an extraction experiment suggest that the active components in Kibizu are lipophilic and hydrophobic. In addition, an in vivo experiment on rats treated with Kibizu showed that the active components were contained in large vein blood. Results of an additional in vivo experiment suggest that metabolites generated by Kibizu-treated rats are primarily contained or modified specifically in the large vein blood.

Keywords

3T3-L1 cells Adipocyte size Kibizu Kurozu Lipid droplets Vinegar 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors like to thank N. Oshima (GE Healthcare) for her expert assistance with the IN Cell Analyzer 1000. This study was supported in part by Nippo Co., Ltd (Osaka, Japan).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chisato Inoue
    • 1
  • Tomomi Kozaki
    • 1
  • Yukiko Morita
    • 1
  • Bungo Shirouchi
    • 2
  • Katsuya Fukami
    • 3
  • Kuniyoshi Shimizu
    • 2
  • Masao Sato
    • 2
  • Yoshinori Katakura
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate School of Bioresources and Bioenvironmental SciencesKyushu UniversityHigashi-kuJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of AgricultureKyushu UniversityHigashi-kuJapan
  3. 3.Material Management CenterKyushu UniversityHigashi-kuJapan

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