Clinical Practice with Children and Adolescents Involved in Bullying and Cyberbullying: Gleaning Guidelines from the Literature

Abstract

Bullying and cyberbullying have received unprecedented international scholarly attention over the last three decades, including increasingly sophisticated descriptive models, measures of associated harm, and studies of whole-school intervention programs. Despite an abundance of articles related to bullying and cyberbullying, there has been relatively little attention to clinical practice with children and adolescents involved in bullying and cyberbullying. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of peer-reviewed academic journal articles published between January 1990 and June 2018 pertaining to individual and group psychotherapy with clients involved in bullying and cyberbullying. Based on this review, we identify four guidelines for clinical practice related to bullying and cyberbullying with children and adolescents.

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Byers, D.S., Mishna, F. & Solo, C. Clinical Practice with Children and Adolescents Involved in Bullying and Cyberbullying: Gleaning Guidelines from the Literature. Clin Soc Work J 49, 20–34 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10615-019-00713-3

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Keywords

  • Bullying
  • Cyberbullying
  • Clinical practice