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Clinical Social Work Journal

, Volume 39, Issue 1, pp 61–67 | Cite as

Developing the Capacity for Reflective Functioning Through an Intersubjective Process

  • Shoshana Ringel
Original Paper

Abstract

The following paper explores the concepts of reflective functioning, metacognition (Main et al. in Adult attachment scoring and classification systems. Regents of the University of California, Berkeley, 2002), and mentalization (Fonagy and Target in Mind to mind: Infant research, neuroscience and psychoanalysis. Other Press, New York, 2008; Fonagy et al. in Affect regulation, mentalization and the development of the self. Other Press, New York, 2002). Using an extended case illustration, the author demonstrates how she uses the clinical process to develop more mature reflective and mentalization capacities with a client through dream analysis, identification of affect states, therapeutic ruptures and mutual play.

Keywords

Attachment theory Metacognition Reflective functioning Mentalization 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Social WorkUniversity of MarylandBaltimoreUSA

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