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Clinical Social Work Journal

, Volume 35, Issue 1, pp 15–23 | Cite as

Social Work Education and Clinical Learning: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

  • Eda G. Goldstein
Original Paper

Abstract

Social Work Education and Clinical Learning by Simpson, Williams, and Segall is a welcome and timely statement about the nature of clinical social work and its implications for educational curricula. The authors took on an awesome task. Educating students for clinical practice is increasingly more daunting than it has been previously and is in considerable disarray, if not a state of crisis. In addition to amplifying and expanding some of the major points the authors make, this discussion considers where we have been, where we are, and where we are going. It describes the educational landscape today, which the author views as bleak with respect to its preparation of students for clinical social work practice. In keeping with clinical social work’s inclusive definition that encompasses a broad knowledge base, diverse practice roles, and a wide range of interventions, this discussion emphasizes the importance of numerous unifying themes that help to distinguish clinical social work from other approaches or from the use of a fragmented assemblage of techniques. The paper considers the role of evidence-based practice and makes some suggestions about future emphases in clinical social work. It concludes with a call to alter the educational landscape.

Keywords

Clinical social work Direct practice Education Training Role of research 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.New York University School of Social WorkNew YorkUSA

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