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Cognitive Therapy and Research

, Volume 28, Issue 6, pp 819–833 | Cite as

The Implementation of Cognitive Therapy in STAR*D

  • Edward S. Friedman
  • Michael E. Thase
  • Sander J. Kornblith
  • Stephen R. Wisniewski
  • Melanie M. Briggs
  • A. John Rush
  • Cheryl Carmin
  • Steven D. Hollon
  • Timothy Petersen
  • Glen Veenstra
Article

Abstract

The Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) project will provide symptomatic and functional outcome data to evaluate the theoretical principles and clinical beliefs that currently guide the treatment of nonpsychotic major depression. Cognitive Therapy (CT) for depression has been chosen as a switch or augmentation treatment for patients who have failed an adequate trial of the antidepressant citalopram. We describe the rationale, organization, and role of CT in STAR*D. We discuss the issues involved in developing and implementing CT in a large, multisite, effectiveness study: therapist selection, training, certification, quality assurance, and post-training supervision. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of our implementation procedures on interpreting the results of the STAR*D study.

cognitive behavior therapy major depression STAR*D study implementation quality 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward S. Friedman
    • 1
  • Michael E. Thase
    • 1
  • Sander J. Kornblith
    • 1
  • Stephen R. Wisniewski
    • 1
  • Melanie M. Briggs
    • 2
  • A. John Rush
    • 2
  • Cheryl Carmin
    • 3
  • Steven D. Hollon
    • 4
  • Timothy Petersen
    • 5
  • Glen Veenstra
    • 6
  1. 1.University of PittsburghPittsburgh
  2. 2.University of TexasDallas
  3. 3.University of IllinoisChicago
  4. 4.Vanderbilt UniversityNashville
  5. 5.Massachusetts General HospitalBoston
  6. 6.Kansas UniversityWichita

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