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Chemistry of Natural Compounds

, Volume 54, Issue 2, pp 387–389 | Cite as

Mono- and Sesquiterpenoids from Artemisia juncea Growing in Uzbekistan

  • R. F. Mukhamatkhanova
  • Kh. M. Bobakulov
  • B. S. Okhundedaev
  • I. D. Sham’yanov
  • H. A. Aisa
  • Sh. Sh. Sagdullaev
Article
  • 27 Downloads

Artemisia juncea Kar. et Kir. is a perennial semishrub of heights up to 60 cm that grows in Central Asia and Kazakhstan [1]. Infusion of the herb is consumed in folk medicine for epilepsy, typhus, fever, and renal diseases and as an anti-inflammatory and anthelmintic agent. An oil infusion of the herb (in linseed or almond oil) is taken orally (1 tsp) for asthma, edema, and convulsions [2].

Volatile compounds from this species are practically unstudied. Essential oil of A. juncea (obtained by water distillation) growing in central Kazakhstan contained camphor, borneol, dihydrocarveol, and azulene-forming sesquiterpenes according to the literature [3]. Populations of this species growing in Uzbekistan have not previously been investigated.

Recently, recommendations were made to compare the compositions of essential oils obtained via water- and steam-distillation with that of an extract obtained at room temperature via treatment of plant raw material with nonpolar solvents (petroleum...

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. F. Mukhamatkhanova
    • 1
  • Kh. M. Bobakulov
    • 1
  • B. S. Okhundedaev
    • 1
  • I. D. Sham’yanov
    • 1
  • H. A. Aisa
    • 2
  • Sh. Sh. Sagdullaev
    • 1
  1. 1.S. Yu. Yunusov Institute of the Chemistry of Plant SubstancesAcademy of Sciences of the Republic of UzbekistanTashkentUzbekistan
  2. 2.Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Plant Resources and Natural Products Chemistry, Xinjiang Technological Institute of Physics and ChemistryChinese Academy of SciencesUrumqiP. R. China

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