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Chemistry of Natural Compounds

, Volume 54, Issue 2, pp 342–343 | Cite as

Chemical Constituents of Branches and Barks of Juglans mandshurica

  • Hyeon Seok Jang
  • Seong Yeon Choi
  • Birang Jeong
  • Hee Jeong Min
  • Heejung Yang
  • Young Soo Bae
Article

Juglans mandshurica Maxim. (Juglandaceae), distributed mainly in China, Russia, and Korea, has been used for the treatment of cancers and has cytotoxic activities on cancer cell lines such as human leukemia cell HL-60 and human prostate cancer cell LNCaP [1, 2, 3]. Previously, diarylheptanoids, triterpenes, and naphthoquinones have been isolated from J. mandshurica [4, 5, 6]. In this study, we isolated six compounds from the branches and barks of J. mandshurica.

The branches and barks of J. mandshurica were collected in Chuncheon City, Gangwon Province of Korea in February 2015. The air-dried branches (1 kg) and barks (1 kg) were separately extracted with MeOH three times for 3 h. Each MeOH extract was partitioned with n-hexane, EtOAc, n-BuOH, and water. The n-hexane extract (JTH, 4.1 g) of branches was subjected to MPLC eluting with n-hexane–EtOAc (15:1 to 1:1) and CHCl3–MeOH (10:1 to 0:1) to give 15 fractions (JTH-1–15). Three subfractions of JTH-12 (JTH-12-1–3) were obtained by...

Notes

Acknowledgment

This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT, and Future Planning (NRF-2015R1C1A1A01053892).

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hyeon Seok Jang
    • 1
  • Seong Yeon Choi
    • 1
  • Birang Jeong
    • 1
  • Hee Jeong Min
    • 2
  • Heejung Yang
    • 1
  • Young Soo Bae
    • 2
  1. 1.College of PharmacyKangwon National UniversityChuncheonRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Wood Adhesives & Extractives Laboratory, Department of Forest Biomaterials Engineering, College of Forest and Environmental SciencesKangwon National UniversityChuncheonRepublic of Korea

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