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Chemistry of Natural Compounds

, Volume 54, Issue 2, pp 339–341 | Cite as

Composition of Lipid Fraction from the Aerial Part of Artemisia frigida

  • E. P. Dylenova
  • S. V. Zhigzhitzhapova
  • T. E. Randalova
  • Zh. A. Tykheev
  • E. I. Imikhenova
  • L. D. Radnaeva
Article

Artemisia frigida Willd. is a petroxerophyte dwarf semishrub of North America and Eurasia that reaches heights of 15–45 cm. The lower part of the stem is woody, perennial, branched, and spreading [1]. A. frigida is spread on stony and well-developed soils by herds pasturing along slopes of northern exposures [2]. A. frigida is used in folk medicine because it contains a complex of biologically active compounds such as essential oil [3, 4], flavonoids [5], etc. However, studies of lipids from this species have not been published.

The goal of the present communication was to study the composition of the lipid fraction from the aerial part of A. frigida. Plants collected in the foothills of Ganzurin Ridge, Ivolginsky District, Republic of Buryatia, in 2015 during budding (sample 1) and flowering (sample 2) and in 2016 during flowering (sample 3) were studied. Herbarium specimens are preserved in the Laboratory of the Chemistry of Natural Systems, BINM, SB, RAS.

Lipids were obtained by...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. P. Dylenova
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. V. Zhigzhitzhapova
    • 1
  • T. E. Randalova
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zh. A. Tykheev
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. I. Imikhenova
    • 2
  • L. D. Radnaeva
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Baikal Institute of Nature Management, Siberian BranchRussian Academy of SciencesUlan-UdeRussia
  2. 2.Buryat State UniversityUlan-UdeRussia

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