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Chemistry of Natural Compounds

, Volume 53, Issue 2, pp 328–332 | Cite as

Synthesis and Biological Activity of 1,11-bis(6,7-Methylenedioxy- and 6,7-Dimethoxy-1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroisoquinolin-1-YL)Undecanes

  • E. O. Terent′eva
  • A. Sh. Saidov
  • Z. S. Khashimova
  • N. E. Tseomashko
  • S. A. Sasmakov
  • D. M. Abdurakhmanov
  • V. I. Vinogradova
  • Sh. S. Azimova
Article
  • 45 Downloads

Two bis(tetrahydroisoquinoline) derivatives of undecane were synthesized from brassylic acid and 3,4-dimethoxy-(or methylenedioxy-)phenylethylamine. It was shown that 4a and 4b were highly cytotoxic for cancer-cell cultures and less toxic to healthy cells and exhibited noticeable antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungal strain Candida albicans. The antifungal activity of 4a exceeded that of the reference drug nystatin.

Keywords

brassylic acid homoveratrylamine homopiperanylamine bis-tetrahydroisoquinoline cytotoxicity MTT HeLa HEp-2 hepatocytes antimicrobial activity Candida albicans 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. O. Terent′eva
    • 1
  • A. Sh. Saidov
    • 2
  • Z. S. Khashimova
    • 3
  • N. E. Tseomashko
    • 1
  • S. A. Sasmakov
    • 1
  • D. M. Abdurakhmanov
    • 1
  • V. I. Vinogradova
    • 1
  • Sh. S. Azimova
    • 1
  1. 1.S. Yu. Yunusov Institute of the Chemistry of Plant SubstancesAcademy of Sciences of the Republic of UzbekistanTashkentUzbekistan
  2. 2.Samarkand State UniversitySamarkandUzbekistan
  3. 3.S. A. Sadykov Institute of Bioorganic ChemistryAcademy of Sciences of the Republic of UzbekistanTashkentUzbekistan

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