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Chemistry of Natural Compounds

, Volume 48, Issue 3, pp 520–521 | Cite as

Analysis of sterol compounds from Sambucus ebulus

  • Maria-Viorica Bubulica
  • Liviu Chirigiu
  • Mariana Popescu
  • Andreea Simionescu
  • Gabriel Anoaica
  • Alexandru Popescu
Article

Sambucus ebulus L. (Caprifoliaceae) is a species native to Europe, southwestern Asia, and northwestern Africa. Plants from Sambucus genus are known in folk medicine for their health benefits, especially Sambucus nigra L., which has been used in different studies.[1, 2, 3].

Sambucus ebulus L. is mentioned in Romanian folk medicine in the treatment of rheumatic pain or cold. Leaves are applied externally to treat wounds, inflammations, and burns. Roots are used in diets for their laxative and diuretic properties. Roots are also a potent appetite supressant. The anti-inflammatory effect of Sambucus ebulus L. has been reported [4,5] and the wound healing potential has been studied [6], but in the specialty papers there are very little data on the chemical composition of this plant.

Phytosterols are present in plant cells as important components of membranes [7]. Campesterol and stigmasterol are the most abundant phytosterols in nature, and a large number of oxidation products can be...

Keywords

Phytosterol National Cholesterol Education Program Stigmasterol Campesterol Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria-Viorica Bubulica
    • 1
  • Liviu Chirigiu
    • 1
  • Mariana Popescu
    • 1
  • Andreea Simionescu
    • 2
  • Gabriel Anoaica
    • 1
  • Alexandru Popescu
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of PharmacyCraiova, RomaniaRomania
  2. 2.University Craiova, Faculty of ChemistryCraiovaRomania

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