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Chemistry of Natural Compounds

, Volume 46, Issue 2, pp 289–290 | Cite as

Rare natural products from the wood of Magnolia grandiflora

  • Hak-Ju Lee
  • M. Khan
  • Ha-Young Kang
  • Don-Ha Choi
  • Park Mi-Jin
  • Lee Hyun-Jung
Article

Magnolia grandiflora L. (Magnoliaceae) is used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of colds, headaches, and stomachache [1???]. The plant has also been used for the treatment of fever, diarrhea, rheumatism and arthritis [2]. Various class of compounds such as sesquiterpenoids [3–5???], coumarins [4], phenylpropanoids [6], lignans [7], glycosides [7, 8???], alkaloids [9], and other compounds [10] have been reported from this plant. The present study describes the isolation and structure determination of seven compounds 17 from the wood of M. grandiflora.

Shade air-dried and powdered wood of M. grandiflora (22.0 kg) was extracted with 95% ethanol. The EtOH extract was concentrated under vacuum until EtOH was completely removed. The dried EtOH extract (170.17 g) was dissolved in distilled water and successively partitioned with n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol saturated with water. The dichloromethane-soluble fraction (27.40 g) was chromatographed on...

Keywords

CDCl3 Ethyl Acetate Coumarin EtOAc Amorphous Powder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hak-Ju Lee
    • 1
  • M. Khan
    • 1
  • Ha-Young Kang
    • 1
  • Don-Ha Choi
    • 1
  • Park Mi-Jin
    • 1
  • Lee Hyun-Jung
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Wood Chemistry & MicrobiologyKorea Forest Research InstituteSeoulKorea

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