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Chemistry of Natural Compounds

, 45:766 | Cite as

Components from Aconitum karakolicum roots

  • S. K. Usmanova
  • Gulnar Sabir
  • Chen Li
  • Ba Hang
  • H. A. Aisa
  • R. Shakirov
Article

The isolation and structures of 22 alkaloids from the aerial part and roots of Aconitum karakolicum Rapaics (Ranunculaceae) growing in Kirgizia (Kungei and Terskei Alatau ridges) have been reported [1, 2, 3, 4]. Pharmacological studies found that the plant alkaloids possess spasmolytic, antiarrhythmic, local anesthetic, and other activities [1].

We investigated the chemical composition of this plant growing in Xinjiang Autonomous Region of the PRC taht was identified at the Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, AS, XAR. Plants of the genus Aconitum are frequently used in China to treat fractures, rheumatism, and neuralgia. A. karakolicum is used in Chinese folk medicine [5].

Air-dried ground roots (1.08 kg) were extracted with EtOH (80%, 10 × 8 L). The first two extracts were combined. Solvent was distilled off. The resulting crystals were separated with EtOH and recrystallized from acetone:water to afford 1 (0.6 g), mp 189–190°C. Compound 1was identified as saccharose by...

Keywords

Alkaloid EtOAc HMBC Spectrum Total Alkaloid Aconitine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. K. Usmanova
    • 1
  • Gulnar Sabir
    • 2
  • Chen Li
    • 3
  • Ba Hang
    • 3
  • H. A. Aisa
    • 3
  • R. Shakirov
    • 1
  1. 1.S. Yu. Yunusov Institute of the Chemistry of Plant SubstancesAcademy of Sciences of the Republic of UzbekistanTashkentRepublic of Uzbekistan
  2. 2.Xinjiang Institute of Chinese Material Medica and EthicaUrumqiChina
  3. 3.Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and ChemistryAcademy of Sciences of the People’s Republic of ChinaUrumchiChina

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